Brighton Rock; Slade at The Goldstone Ground

Brighton RockGlam rock band Slade, with their iconic leader Noddy Holder, dominated the airwaves for the first half of the 1970s. They wrote their name into British culture forever in ’73 with the smash-hit festive anthem, “Merry Xmas Everybody”. The band’s releases spent more than 300 weeks in the UK charts and sold more records than any other group in Britain that decade. Yet, despite these achievements, almost nobody remembers their one and only attempt at a football song back in 1978; “Give Us A Goal”. It’s a great shame as the song enjoys a special connection with Brighton and Hove Albion. Strangely enough, the Goldstone Ground provided the rockers with the location for their music video. On a freezing winter day in February, the band were present for the Albion’s match with Burnley where Slade made Brighton rock.

This post pieces together the story of the single through articles, cuttings and children’s television performances.


SLADE: “GIVE US A GOAL” (Barn Records, Released 1978)

slade-daddioSlade, as we know them now, began life under various different guises in the mid-1960s – The Vendors, The ‘N Betweens, Ambrose Slade – before agent John Gunnel and his business partner Chas Chandler paid a visit. As the 1970s approached, Chandler liked what he heard and agreed to manage the band. They adopted a skinhead look, wrote their own songs and shortened the name down to just ‘Slade’. They broke into the charts in August 1971 under Chandler’s direction and positioned themselves within the ‘glam rock’ movement, with the long hair and big costumes that went with it. Success followed as they began to take over the UK charts for the next few years, peaking with their best-selling juggernaut ‘Merry Xmas Everybody’; the 1973 Christmas number one.

But every rise comes with a fall, and the band’s popularity declined after that. A move to America came in the mid-70s, to little critical acclaim. By 1977, Slade aimed for a comeback in the UK so Chas Chandler switched them to his own label; Barn Records. The move didn’t bring much initial joy, with only a tribute song to the death of Elvis Presley breaking the top forty. They followed this up with an idea for a song to kick off 1978 based on football chants, aiming to capitalise on their old skinhead following, a look which was closely linked with supporters of the sport.

With their new football single written and ready to go, Slade needed to record a music video to flog to television programmes to use and promote the song for its release date (some publicatiosn report this as 3rd March 1978 though many others suggest it was actually 24th February). According to website Dave Kemp and Slade, Chas Chandler lived in the Sussex area at the time and had contacts with the Brighton and Hove Albion directors so arranged to use their Goldstone Ground home for the video shoot. Ahead of the visit of Burnley in the middle of February, Brighton’s North Stand were treated to some top-notch rock ‘n’ roll pre-match entertainment.

SLADE Cartoon promo

A cartoon promo advert in the music newspaper Record Mirror for the new Slade single as the band score past Jim Lea


FILMING THE VIDEO

Brighton 2-1 Burnley; Saturday 11th February 1978

SLADE Crowd SLADE Albion

Brighton competed in the Second Division of English football having gone up from the Third tier the previous year. Managed by Alan Mullery, the club were going well in the promotion shake up again with two thirds of the season gone. They’d won twelve of the twenty-seven League fixtures thus far, losing just the once at fortress Goldstone. Twenty-two-year-old striker Peter Ward was fast becoming a club legend, dominating the goalscoring charts to add to his tally of a whopping thirty-six the previous season. Albion’s number eight had a new strike partner in Malcolm Poskett, who scored on his debut the previous week at Hull.

Protecting goalkeeper Eric Steele, the Seagulls defence included ex-Huddersfield and Coventry man Chris Cattlin, who would later return as manager. Preston’s young, impressive Player of the Year 1977, Mark Lawrenson, moved to Sussex that summer for £100,000 to play alongside former North End teammate Gary Williams and established centre half Andy Rollings.

Brian Horton was pivotal in the middle of the park. Local lad Tony Towner featured on the right wing, with Welsh international Peter O’Sullivan serving the other flank. Long-serving O’Sullivan joined as a teenager in 1970. Completing the home line up was the midfielder nicknamed the ‘tank’; Paul Clark made his debut back in November ’77 to grab the number ten shirt.

Perhaps inspired by Slade’s pre-match singalong, both teams did what the rockers asked. Brighton gave us goals from Horton and Poskett to defeat Burnley two-one, defender Derek Scott netted for the visitors. Mullery’s men sat fourth in the Division Two table, the same place where they’d finish at the end of the season. Albion agonisingly missed out on promotion to the top flight on goal difference alone; nine worse than third placed Tottenham. In fact, they were only two points off the title! The foundations, though, were in place for a successful promotion push the following season as Brighton hit the big time at last.

SLADE Clap SLADE Guitar and backing vocals

But before the match, it was Slade’s turn to ignite the ground. Their line up at the time comprised four members: Noddy Holder, Dave Hill, Jim Lea and Don Powell. The quartet performed in front of the North Stand at the Goldstone, on a little stage by the side of the pitch. Noddy was the enigmatic frontman, responsible for lead vocals and played rhythm guitar. In this video, draped in the blue and white Albion scarf (above left), he led the clapping and chanting, rousing fans to join in at every opportunity.

Above right, we see guitarists Jim Lea (yellow and black scarf) and Dave Hill (red and white scarf). Jim co-wrote the song with Noddy, as was the case for most of Slade’s back catalogue. The track heavily relied on the guitar to drive the familiar riff of the football chant, topped off with the rasping voice Holder was renowned for. The chorus lyrics were catchy; “We’ll beat ya, defeat ya, we’re ready to roll! Get the ball into the net and give us a goal!” The reviews weren’t glowing, but one from the music paper ‘Record Mirror’ at the time did state it “recaptures the football fervour that they used to build up” at gigs.

SLADE Drums SLADE Pitch

The band earned a reputation for their energetic and engaging Live performances, making good use of the gathered crowd for a fantastic atmosphere. Despite Slade’s decision to move into the football song market, the band members weren’t particularly fussed by the game. Hailing from Wolverhampton, some of the members would look out for their results but weren’t particularly sporty themselves. Drummer Don Powell is shown, above left, in the white scarf. Don recovered from a very bad car accident five years earlier, which left him with lifelong injuries and killed his partner.

SLADE Noddy SLADE Football

There was an existing link between football and popular music, with many clubs and teams releasing their own songs. For the 1970 World Cup, England’s trophy holders sang the famous ‘Back Home’, which reached top spot and kicked off a tradition of the tournament anthem to celebrate their participation. Clubs reaching the FA Cup Final would often follow suit, with the likes of Arsenal, Leeds and Chelsea all lending their voices to vinyl early on in the decade. The players tended to also appear in the video. So this recording needed some footballing actions shots too.

SLADE Dave SLADE More football

Interspersed between clips of Noddy and the gang giving the North Stand a performance to remember with their musical instruments, the band also took part in a football match with some of the Brighton players. The musicians donned the famous blue and white stripes of the Albion for a kickabout on a frosty winter’s day, with their ‘opponents’ decked in red. It was so cold that Dave Hill needed a thick bobble hat to protect his skinhead top, with the guitarist complaining of the temperatures throughout. This was recorded separately to the Burnley match day, during a squad training session. Several of the Albion first team were involved, including Eric Steele who was standing firm in goal. See how many you can spot.

SLADE Supporters SLADE North Stand

A crowd of 22,694 was recorded in attendance at the Goldstone for the Burnley match. The North Stand terrace behind the goal was full of Albion fans ready to make their music video cameo in the build up to the big game. With the club flying at the top end of the table, it was an exciting time to be a Brighton supporter. It’s not every day you get to be a film extra. Could you imagine Withdean Stadium being used as a rock backdrop?!

Spectators were shown making their way down to the stadium and through the turnstiles. In the stands, the sea of blue and white scarves brightened (and Brighton-ed) up the screen, bouncing around to the music being played out just yards in front of them. A small stage was erected in the penalty area adjacent to the goal to elevate Slade, their recording equipment and instruments whilst several cameramen recorded the scenes.

SLADE Goal SLADE Net

The filmmakers wanted a big finish to the video, with one of the band scoring a goal as the climax. However, none of them had really played the game since leaving school and so it appeared much trickier than first thought. None of them could put it in the back of the net! Which might explain the slightly odd footage of the ball entering a virtually open goal (above right) but with no indication of how it got there. Drummer Don Powell is credited by Dave Kemp with the strike to bring the curtain down on the video. As the lyrics suggested, they stopped their fancy footwork and just gave us a goal. The whistle blew. It was now all ready to go and send round the broadcasters for airplay.

SLADE Programme

Excerpt from the Brighton programme against Sunderland, 25/2/78, housed online by Seagulls Programmes

Disappointingly, the song failed to chart and so there would be no appearance on the number one music show, Top of the Pops. However, that didn’t mean it sunk without a trace. Children’s television programmes gave many artists a platform to connect with the public, some even making their screen debuts there. First to televise the band’s new football song was ITV’s anarchic Saturday morning powerhouse TISWAS.


TELEVISION COVERAGE

‘TISWAS’ video broadcast; ATV, 9.30am-12pm; Sat 4th March 1978 

TISWAS Titles TISWAS Tarrant

TISWAS TV Times Listing

TV Times Listing, 4/3/78

As confirmed by the band’s excellent fan site Dave Kemp and Slade, TISWAS aired the ‘Give us a Goal’ music video on the morning of Saturday 4th March; not long after release. An acronym for ‘Today is Saturday, Watch and Smile’, TISWAS began in January 1974 as a strand for children which linked together programmes in ITV’s midlands region of ATV. As the popularity of the presenter links overtook much of the programming they were introducing, it began to be picked up by other regions as the years progressed. By the time of this fourth series during 1977/78, the HTV, Anglia, Granada, Border and Scottish Television regions were all airing the show.

At the time it was fronted by ATV’s news and current affairs host Chris Tarrant (above right), as he did from the outset, and former Midlands sports reporter Trevor East alongside newcomer this series, Sally James. TISWAS started to enter its ‘golden age’ with slapstick characters such as ‘The Phantom Flan Flinger’ causing chaos in the studio, and early appearances from comedians and showbiz stars who would later go on to become household names; such as Lenny Henry, Frank Carson, Bob Carolgees and Jasper Carrott.

But the ITV region serving the Brighton and Hove area, Southern Television, didn’t begin to take the show until, at least, the end of 1979. So local Albion fans would not have seen their Goldstone Ground home appearing in Slade’s music video when TISWAS gave it this television outing.


3

‘Get It Together’ performance; Granada, 4.20-4.45pm; Tue 14th March 1978

GET Titles GET Roy North

GET TV Listing

TV Times Listing, 14/3/78

Slade performed the song in the Granada studios in mid-March, as they appeared on children’s afternoon programme Get It Together on ITV. This was a weekly pop music show as groups and artists showcased their latest single in front of a studio of excitable children. Slade’s performance was on the penultimate episode of series 2.

Get It Together was broadcast on Tuesday afternoons at 4.20pm, the ideal post-school slot. It was shown across most of the ITV network, with the exception of Wales. The performances provided many bands with their first TV appearance at a time when there were few opportunities for up and coming acts.

Another key element of the show was performances from the hosts, who at the time were Roy North and New Faces winner Linda Fletcher. They were the show’s original presenters, joining for the April 1977 launch. As well as singing, North was better known as having been the straight man to Basil Brush for three years, playing Mr Roy.

As the series went on, it adapted its format to include a house band with backing singers and, of course, its own dance troupe – known as The Teri Scoble Dancers. It would run for over four years with almost one hundred episodes.

Slade’s song was part of a football themed episode, sharing the bill with ‘Hampden’s Heroes’ singing Scotland’s track for that summer’s World Cup. The audience cheered and clapped along, adorned with football shirts and scarves, to really get into the spirit of it.

GET Slade GET Audience


4

‘Cheggers Plays Pop’ performance; BBC1, 4.40-5.05pm; Mon 17th April 1978

CHEGGERS Titles CHEGGERS Chegwin

CHEGGERS Genome Listing

Radio Times Listing from BBC Genome

Young Scouse actor-turned-television presenter Keith ‘Cheggers’ Chegwin became a household name in the mid-70s through his work on children’s programming. He was part of the BBC’s Saturday morning alternative to TISWASMulti-Coloured Swap Shop with Noel Edmonds and John Craven from 1976.

That led to success in his own right as host of Cheggers Plays Pop two years later. This was classic kids TV, with a screaming young audience taking part in silly games and challenges in the studio, punctuated by performances from the latest hitmakers. The second ever episode had Slade belting out a performance of “Give us a Goal”. Again, the crowd were decked in football scarves to look the part.

CHEGGERS Slade CHEGGERS Slade on stage


5

FIFA ’09 commercial; EA Sports television advert soundtrack, 2008 

FIFA Rooney FIFA Gameplay

FIFA TaglineAfter not achieving much success, the song garnered a mini revival some thirty years later. Computer game makers EA Sports used “Give us a Goal” as the soundtrack for the official television advert for the latest in their football series FIFA ’09. The full four-minute commercial featured Manchester United and England striker Wayne Rooney taking on Real Madrid’s Higuain as they went head to head playing the game, whilst hundreds gathered in the street to cheer and watch on the big screen.

Whilst this wasn’t enough to push the track into the charts for the first time, it did bring it to a whole new audience who wouldn’t have been aware of it or even around at the first time of asking.


Those Albion supporters who were heading to the Goldstone Ground on that bitterly cold day on 11th February 1978 would likely have been blissfully unaware that later that afternoon they’d be the unwitting stars of a rock music video. The players must have been listening closely to Slade’s instructions to “Give us a Goal”, as the following season Brighton were promoted into the top flight for the first time in club history. Cum on feel the noize!

SLADE Scarves

SOURCES and EXTRA READING

World Cup 1994 on ITV

World Cup Logo

FIFA brought the world of football to the United States of America for the staging of the fifteenth World Cup in 1994. However, the tournament would perhaps be best remembered for events off the field. On the opening day, America was gripped by an altogether different occasion involving a sports star as former NFL player OJ Simpson went on the run from the police in a car chase which gripped the nation and played out Live on television, following suspicions of murdering his wife. When the football did get underway, it was once again Diego Maradona who grabbed the headlines for the wrong reasons when he was sent home after two group matches due to failing doping. He was found with a ‘cocktail of drugs’ in his system, which came as no surprise to anyone who saw his extreme close-up celebration at the camera after his one and only goal this summer against Greece. And Colombian defender Andres Escobar was tragically murdered by members of a drugs cartel five days after his country was eliminated from the tournament, believed to be in retaliation for his own goal against the host nation in the group stages. Elsewhere there were no home nations present at the World Cup for the first time since 1938, owing largely to Graham Taylor’s disastrous campaign with England and a Scotland side in decline. Republic of Ireland were the nearest representative and upset the odds immediately by beating Italy in New York. They graced the knockout stage before elimination at the hands of the Dutch. The competition culminated with the first ever Final penalty shoot-out, as Italy were defeated by Brazil in one of the most laboured of matches. British broadcasters BBC and ITV were there to beam the vast majority of matches direct to our late-night living rooms. In this post I look at the efforts of ITV, who opted to base themselves over in the International Broadcast Centre in Dallas.

 

ITV Sport logoPresenters; Matthew Lorenzo, Tony Francis
Pundits; Denis Law, Ray Wilkins, Don Howe, Jack Charlton
Commentators; Brian Moore, Alan Parry, John Helm, Peter Brackley, Rob Palmer
Co-Commentators; Ron Atkinson, Kevin Keegan, Trevor Francis
Reporters; Gary Newbon, Gabriel Clarke, Phil Mepham


TITLE SEQUENCE & THEME TUNE

ITV Titles

Theme: Daryl Hall & The Sounds of Blackness – Gloryland

ITV’s title music was also the tournament’s official song, sung by Daryl Hall of Hall and Oates fame, accompanied by Minnesota based gospel choir The Sounds of Blackness. Gloryland featured heavy saxophone use, patriotic lyrics and was very catchy. The titles lasted just under a minute and incorporated the ITV Sport logo and programme sponsors Panasonic into the piece. The song was also used on the closing credits as well as instrumental stings going in and out of advert breaks.

ITV titles 1 ITV titles 2 ITV titles 3 ITV titles 4

Lots of typical American imagery featured, with the flag draped and the eagle flying through, mixed with football action which was updated throughout the tournament. The flags of the various participants were also shown rippling across the screen. It ended with the eagle landing and turning its head to the side, where its eye would form the letter O of the World Cup 94 title card. Early in the tournament, the flags would unveil US landmarks such as the Statue of Liberty or Mount Rushmore instead of footballing action, and were variable depending on the match or programme it was introducing. Below is the title sequence to the Italy v Spain Quarter Final.


PRESENTATION TEAM

ITV Lorenzo IBC

Matthew Lorenzo anchored ITV’s World Cup coverage for the one and only time, in doing so becoming the youngest lead presenter of a tournament at the age of 35. He enjoyed rather a whirlwind success with ITV, having joined the Sport department ahead of the 1993/94 campaign to front Live Champions League football. The competition had launched the year before with Ian St John at the helm but a shake-up of personnel saw huge change. Carlton and independent production company Grand Slam Sports took over from LWT in producing the football and cleared out the majority of their old guard; Saint and Greavsie, Elton Welsby and Nick Owen to name a few. In came Lorenzo with a newer breed of pundit; Don Howe, Ray Wilkins, Trevor Francis and, a returning favourite, Denis Law. This new team saw one of the most dismal England campaigns in recent times as, under Graham Taylor, the national side failed to qualify for the 1994 World Cup. ITV picked up away matches in the Netherlands and Poland as well as friendly competition the 1993 US Cup. England failed to win any of those five matches.

Lorenzo 94 Tony Francis 94ITV Studio 2

Undeterred by England’s failure, ITV decided to base their entire production on location for the first time at a World Cup. In 1990 there was a dual presentation from London and Italy and previous tournaments had largely been based in their London Studios. But for this one their infamous Dallas bunker was the setting, part of the International Broadcast Centre shown above right. However, as this was a windowless studio disconnected from the atmosphere of the grounds and the comforts of home it really lacked the desired effect. Indeed, many viewers perhaps would not have known they weren’t in London at all. Lorenzo was a perfectly competent host, hired on his ability to remain cool, relaxed and witty in the style of Des Lynam on the Beeb. But that doesn’t translate as well when there are regular ad breaks and scripted links. ITV’s coverage of the tournament was panned by critics, viewers and even their own staff and it seemed Lorenzo was made scapegoat. When the tournament ended he was given the boot and wasn’t even invited to their World Cup wrap party – according to a 2017 interview Lorenzo gave to the hugely entertaining Quickly Kevin 90s football podcast. He returned to where his broadcasting days began – Sky – and forged a successful career hosting multiple Live sports and magazine programmes including the first incarnation of Goals on Sunday. When Matthew wasn’t hosting in Dallas, his understudy on highlights, previews and other Live games was Tony Francis (above right); previously ITV’s Champions League reporter and host in the Central region.

Law 94 ITV WilkinsITV duo

ITV’s core punditry line up was small but their US base did allow for co-commentators to do stints in the studio and vice versa. Leading the line was former Manchester United striker Denis Law. After a hugely successful career in the North West of England, the Scotsman became a regular in the media after retiring in 1974, including at the ’78 World Cup for BBC. In the 1980s co-hosted Granada’s highlights show Kick Off Match with Elton Welsby. He was part of ITV’s commentary team for the 1982 World Cup, a role he resumed alongside Brian Moore for Manchester United’s early Champions League adventures at the beginning of the 90s. For this World Cup he was largely studio based with occasional stints on the road up on the gantry. As the tournament progressed, so did his tan as those hot summer days started to show! A mainstay of this ITV studio was former England international Ray ‘Butch’ Wilkins. The ex-midfielder was a regular at tournaments for the national side before his last cap in 1986. Whilst still playing at club level he was now a regular in the media. For Italia ’90 he co-commentated for BBC and was a constant presence on Channel 4’s groundbreaking coverage of Serie A in the early part of the decade. When ITV picked up a couple of England Live matches, he joined the team for those, including a furious appearance after defeat to the Netherlands thanks to Ronald Koeman left England all but unable to qualify for USA ’94. His combative playing style was at odds with his friendly, charming persona on television and would go on to feature heavily on the box for many years to come across a variety of broadcasters as well as being in and out of coaching.

Howe 94 ITV Charlton

Another stable of Channel 4’s excellent Football Italia coverage was Don Howe (above left). Going into this tournament, Howe had recently joined new England manager Terry Venables’ set up as assistant coach, having previously worked under Ron Greenwood and Bobby Robson for several years. As a right-back, his playing career was largely at West Brom before joining Arsenal. When he went into management, he took charge of both clubs amongst others. Howe’s reputation as a coach was very high and was brought in to add a tactical perspective, following Andy Gray and Alan Hansen’s lead on other networks. The fourth regular in the studio team was Trevor Francis, another of ITV’s recent England international recruits. Francis’ distinctive West Country accent and nasally tone made his voice instantly recognisable and, like Wilkins, came across as a very likeable man on screen. Despite being 40 years old at this World Cup, Francis had only just finished playing, enjoying a player-manager role at Sheffield Wednesday. He worked for ITV’s coverage of the 1990 World Cup as well as the 1988 European Championships and was a voice in demand when his playing and managing schedule could fit. The final member of the ITV studio was unavailable for the first couple of weeks due to actually being part of the tournament! Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton slotted in to the line-up after his side exited at the last 16 stage. His brother Bobby had been a familiar presence over on the BBC during the 1980s, punditing and commentating on Cup Finals and major tournaments, whilst Jack had been involved on ITV even earlier; part of the fiery 1974 World Cup panel in London with Brian Clough and Derek Dougan. Jack Charlton took over the reins of Ireland in 1986 and had successfully guided them to the Finals in his first four qualification campaigns – ’88, ’90, ’92 and this one. During the Euros in Sweden two years earlier, he also worked for ITV once Ireland had been knocked out and during his weeks in America made many friends with press and journalists around the world. He’d continue to be a presence on ITV for the following years.

ITV Moore & Atkinson

In the commentary box leading ITV’s coverage was once again Brian Moore. This was his seventh World Cup with ITV and was very much THE voice of football for them stretching back three decades. With ITV’s relatively small portfolio now compared to previous years, he would cover pretty much every big match they had; European Cup Finals, England internationals and major tournaments. For this Cup, he was reluctant to spend the duration away from his family and so had a break during the last 16 matches, returning to England for a few days. This gave an opportunity for bigger Live matches to the rest of ITV’s bunch; Alan Parry, John Helm and Peter Brackley. As with 1990, Moore focussed solely on commentating instead of combining it with presenting. Opening ITV’s tournament was second choice Alan Parry. He joined the network from the BBC in 1985 principally for Live athletics commentaries. Over the next couple of years he became more and more involved in their football, and by the time Martin Tyler left for Sky, Parry had risen to number two for Italia ’90 and Euro ’92. He was Central’s voice of the Football League, commentating on a Live match most weeks and one of only a few who survived the big overhaul behind the scenes. Helm joined Yorkshire Television in 1981 and covered matches around the country when the highlights were networked two years later. This was his fourth World Cup for ITV and was given perhaps his most high profile assignments yet, covering the non-Live Semi Final and Third Place Play Off matches for the highlights shows. This was Peter Brackley’s first World Cup back at ITV after four years on satellite television with Sky and Eurosport; including Italia ’90 for the latter as well as the former’s first ever Live match which came from the Zenith Data Systems Cup (also Sky One showed a tie from that Cup between Crystal Palace and Swindon in February 1990, which coincidentally had Matthew Lorenzo as pitchside reporter and Ron Atkinson alongside Brackley). Completing the commentary line up was Rob Palmer. He was one of ITV’s rising stars, having joined Granada from BBC radio earlier in the decade. His previous career was actually on the field, as goalkeeper for the likes of Derby’s youth academy as well as in America and non-League. For ITV his voice was heard on Live League matches in the North West and various highlights, including for the first time at a major tournament.

Atkinson & Newbon

Keeping the commentators’ company on the gantry were ITV regulars Ron Atkinson and Kevin Keegan, along with the previously mentioned Trevor Francis and Denis Law who combined it with studio appearances. Atkinson was the principle summariser and had been on and off for many years, whenever he wasn’t in management. His major tournament commentaries date back as far 1980 where he did the Final with Brian Moore and covered ever subsequent Championships to this point bar Euro ’84. His perma-tan, recognisable voice and fondness for creating his own language turned him into a popular cult figure and was the go-to man for ITV whenever a big match was on and was Central Television’s main man. His partnership with Brian Moore was particularly enjoyable. The other regular partner was Kevin Keegan. The ex-England hero had featured in the studio for ITV during his playing career, including on the groundbreaking World Cup punditry panels during the 1970s which continued on into the 80s. With Ian St John dropped, Keegan took his tournament co-commentary spot behind Atkinson for this Cup and featured on the Champions League. He combined this with his first managerial position at Newcastle United where he was enjoying great success. ITV used him whenever they could from this point on.

ITV Newbon Clarke 94

Reporting on the action around the country and on the touchlines were Gary Newbon, Gabriel Clarke (above right) and Phil Mepham. Newbon was the chief reporter and covered the Republic of Ireland matches as well as the pick of the rest, interviewing players and managers. His association with ITV dates back to the 1960s when he began with Westward TV before becoming most known for his work in the Midlands on ATV then Central. He was the main pitchside reporter across ITV’s Live output – England, European Cup and tournaments – as well as hosting regional presentations of news and sport. Understudy to Newbon was Gabriel Clarke. He joined Saint and Greavsie‘s show as a reporter in 1991, voicing goal round ups, features and interviews until its demise the following summer. He would appear in front of the camera following this tournament, hosting the new Endsleigh Football League Extra networked highlights programme. Another voice heard during coverage of this World Cup was Phil Mepham, doing programme features and round ups. Mepham was a sports reporter for the Central region, clearly signalling which area the new ITV Sport bosses were getting much of their talent from. In the Final credits, Mepham was listed as ‘News Editor’ rather than reporter.


LIVE MATCH SELECTION

ITV’s pick selection of the World Cup was front-loaded, choosing to guarantee themselves with a couple of the Republic of Ireland’s group matches ahead of unknown knockout clashes. As a result, this left them with the middle of the night kick-off time for the Semi Final and the weaker looking Quarter Finals. They showed one fewer match in the group stages than their BBC counterparts (technically one and a half as only the second half of USA v Romania was Live and even that was a last minute decision replacing scheduled highlights), which lead to calls of their coverage being a bit half-bothered. With the kick-off times being quite unfriendly to UK audiences, and having no English representatives, it was impressive that so much of the group stage was covered Live. Clashing matches were not, with Eurosport picking up the bulk of those (and simulcasting many others with the terrestrial channels). Overall, ITV broadcast nineteen World Cup matches Live and direct from USA 1994.

GROUP STAGES; Friday 17th June
Spain 2-2 South Korea (12.30am Kick Off)

Saturday 18th June
Rep of Ireland 1-0 Italy (9pm)

Monday 20th June
Netherlands 2-1 Saudi Arabia (12.30am)

Tuesday 21st June
Germany 1-1 Spain (9pm)

Wednesday 22nd June
USA 2-1 Colombia (12.30am)

Thursday 23rd June
South Korea 0-0 Bolivia (12.30am)

Friday 24th June
Rep of Ireland 1-2 Mexico (5.30pm) & Sweden 3-1 Russia (12.30am)

Saturday 25th June
Belgium 1-0 Netherlands (5.30pm)

Sunday 26th June
USA 0-1 Romania (9pm) *2nd Half Live only*

Tuesday 28th June
Brazil 1-1 Sweden (9pm)

LAST 16; Saturday 2nd July
Spain 3-0 Switzerland (9.30pm)

Sunday 3rd July
Sweden 3-1 Saudi Arabia (6pm)

Monday 4th July
USA 0-1 Brazil (8.30pm)

Tuesday 5th July
Italy 1-1 Nigeria, 2-1 AET (6pm)

QUARTER FINALS; Saturday 9th July
Italy 2-1 Spain (5.05pm)

Sunday 10th July
Sweden 1-1 Romania, 2-2 AET – SWE win 5-4 on penalties (8.30pm)

SEMI FINALS; Wednesday 13th July
Brazil 1-0 Sweden (12.30am)

FINAL; Sunday 17th July
Brazil 0-0 Italy, AET – BRA win 3-2 on penalties (8.30pm)


COVERAGE & GRAPHICS

ITV Sport Ident ITV Sponsor

The ITV Sport logo kicked off the coverage of each programme by fading in over a spinning football, incorporated into the title sequence and sponsorship whilst Gloryland began to play. The logo was adapted to have the American style stars and stripes across the letter V. ITV’s coverage was sponsored by Panasonic using the tagline “Great shots of the World Cup”. Their sponsorship bumpers had children painted with the various colours of the competing nations flags. After this, the USA flag draped over the screen and the full title sequence came to life as the beat of the music kicked in.

ITV intro ITV Mepham

ITV’s graphics were simplistic, mostly using a lower third bar flying in and out from right of screen. The Americanised ITV Sport logo was placed on the left whilst the text was bold on the top line and italicised on the bottom line. These were used during the studio coverage. Above left; we have an example of the introductory graphic setting the scene for the upcoming Live game with the fixture and kick off time. Above right; the on-screen graphic at the beginning of Phil Mepham’s report captioning his name in the build up to Italy versus Spain.

ITV graphics 1 ITV aston 1

Above left; Full screen graphic outlaying Italy’s group and their odds to win it at the beginning of the tournament during the preview programme. The background featured a couple of flags, as also appearing in the title sequence. Above right; ITV’s World Cup astons for managers and players. The additional detail shows the flag of the country, in this case Brazil for their manager Carlos Alberto Parreira.

ITV Italy line up ITV Spain line up

ITV’s team formation line up graphic would differ depending on what part of the programme they were shown, with an opaque background if shown during the studio parts and a semi-translucent background for kick off. Above left; the Italy formation for their match against Spain as shown during the pre-match build up with the pundits. The same background is being used as earlier and the starting eleven is lined up in their playing positions. Above right; the formation graphic that the commentator ran through immediately before kick-off. The semi-translucent graphic allowed the stadium to become the background. This example is also from Spain’s clash with Italy.

Ireland Team FIFA graphics

If ITV did not use their own graphics for the team line ups ahead of kick off, the world feed graphics would be used, as shown above left. This would be the same on the BBC. The world feed graphics had a blue background with italic writing and underlining dots. During the match at occasional intervals, the clock would appear in the top right of the screen, as shown above right. Any in-game graphics for player names, yellow cards, substitutions etc would all be world feed.

ITV Kick Off ITV Comms

At the kick-off of each ITV match, the scene would be set by graphics in the lower third on the right hand side. The fixture would flash up followed by “Live from the” stadium and location information; above left. ITV then added their commentary team name checks; above right. These were made in the style of the official world feed, with a blue background and white text. The panels featured the same faint lines within the blue, mimicking the official tournament branding.

ITV replays ITV in game aston

For action replays, the footage would fly in from the left of screen into the middle with a big white border; above left. Once done, the replay would fly out to the right hand side in a similar fashion. This was the same across the world and occurred for all matches bar the final, where the white border was replaced by a thicker bar stating the two competing countries. Above right; an example of an in-game name aston for Swedish forward Kennet Andersson. As mentioned earlier, these graphics were provided by the host broadcaster for the tournament and used around the world.

ITV Scorebar

The host broadcaster did not provide a permanent scoreboard, allowing each rights holder to add their own custom one over the top of the pictures. Scoreboards and on-screen clocks weren’t particularly common on UK television. Indeed, it was seen as somewhat revolutionary when Sky Sports adopted one for the launch of their Premiership coverage in 1992, however other sports and broadcasters had used permanent scoreboards on occasions prior to this. ITV followed suit the following year for their European and domestic football coverage and by the time of the 1994 World Cup it was very much a rarity to not have the constant reminder of the score and clock present on the main UK broadcasters. Above; the US-style ITV Sport logo was slapped on the top-left of screen, with translucent boxes surrounding it. The scoreline with full team names appeared in a bar on the right, whilst the timer went underneath the logo. For broadcasters that did not use a permanent clock, the world feed graphics popped up on occasions with a reminder of the score at the bottom of the screen and the time in the top right above a nice little pie chart showing the match progress (demonstrated higher up the page). This was very similar in principle to the domestic scoreboard used in previous months by ITV, with the logo left of the fixture and clock.


FEATURES & SUPPORT PROGRAMMING

Highlights and preview programmes did exist in the ITV schedule but they were not regular. The late night kick offs did allow for an extended build up and therefore an opportunity for highlights of that day’s other matches. For the primetime kick offs, coverage was generally kept to a minimum, with fifteen to thirty minute intros and little by way of post-match reaction and analysis. Tony Francis often presented what little amount of preview and review programming there was, with former magazine staple Saint and Greavsie now axed following the loss of top flight football in 1992.


THE FINAL

ITV’s coverage of the World Cup Final was hosted Live from their Dallas studio inside the International Broadcast Centre. Republic of Ireland manager Jack Charlton was a guest alongside the regular studio team.

BRAZIL 0-0 ITALY (AET, BRA win 3-2 on pens) World Cup 1994 Final, Los Angeles
Sunday 17th July 1994, 8.30pm Kick Off ITV Logo

ITV Credits 1 ITV Credits 2

PRESENTER Matthew Lorenzo GUESTS Jack Charlton, Don Howe, Ray Wilkins & Denis Law
COMMENTATORS Brian Moore & Ron Atkinson
Hosted from the IBC, Dallas     8-11pm Live on ITV (Extended to approx 11.30pm)

Trophy Lift 2

For details on BBC’s World Cup 1994 coverage click HERE.

World Cup 1994 on the BBC

World Cup Logo FIFA brought the world of football to the United States of America for the staging of the fifteenth World Cup in 1994. However, the tournament would perhaps be best remembered for events off the field. On the opening day, America was gripped by an altogether different occasion involving a sports star as former NFL player OJ Simpson went on the run from the police in a car chase which gripped the nation and played out Live on television, following suspicions of murdering his wife. When the football did get underway, it was once again Diego Maradona who grabbed the headlines for the wrong reasons when he was sent home after two group matches due to failing doping. He was found with a ‘cocktail of drugs’ in his system, which came as no surprise to anyone who saw his extreme close-up celebration at the camera after his one and only goal this summer against Greece. And Colombian defender Andres Escobar was tragically murdered by members of a drugs cartel five days after his country was eliminated from the tournament, believed to be in retaliation for his own goal against the host nation in the group stages. BBC pundit Alan Hansen clumsily, and presumably accidentally, described defending during the Argentina versus Nigeria match the day after Escobar’s death in the worst way; “the Argentine defender wants shooting for a mistake like that.” Elsewhere there were no home nations present at the World Cup for the first time since 1938, owing largely to Graham Taylor’s disastrous campaign with England and a Scotland side in decline. Republic of Ireland were the nearest representative and upset the odds immediately by beating Italy in New York. They graced the knockout stage before elimination at the hands of the Dutch. The competition culminated with the first ever Final penalty shoot-out, as Italy were defeated by Brazil in one of the most laboured of matches. British broadcasters BBC and ITV were there to beam the vast majority of matches direct to our late-night living rooms. In this post I look at the efforts of the BBC, who opened the tournament with the ceremony and the first match.

 

BBC SportPresenters; Des Lynam, Bob Wilson
Pundits;
 Jimmy Hill, Alan Hansen, Terry Venables, Gary Lineker, David O’Leary, Steve Coppell, David Baddiel, Frank Skinner
Commentators; Barry Davies, John Motson, Tony Gubba, Clive Tyldesley, Gerald Sinstadt
Co-Commentators; Trevor Brooking, Liam Brady, John Fashanu, Chris Waddle
Reporters; Ray Stubbs, Hazel Irvine, Garth Crooks


TITLE SEQUENCE & THEME TUNE

Grandstand Titles

Theme: Leonard Bernstein – America (from West Side Story)

The BBC went route one with their choice of theme tune; using ‘America’. Taken from the musical West Side Story, they used Leonard Bernstein’s instrumental version. The familiar tune was definitely one that would stay in your head but after the monumental success of the 1990 titles with Nessun Dorma, this was a bit of a climb down. However, the celebratory joy of the American World Cup came across in this tune even if the dog barking sound effects were a slightly odd addition!

BBC titles 1 BBC titles 4 BBC titles 2 BBC titles 3

The titles kicked off with the instruments blaring in full flow whilst cutting to various shots of famous American landmarks. Starting with fireworks by the Statue of Liberty before flashing through the likes of the Brooklyn Bridge and the huge buildings that crept into the New York skyline. When the music quietened, the titles switched to clips of footballing action, updated as the tournament progressed. In the example here, we saw the likes of Ray Houghton’s goal against Italy in the group stage and Jack Charlton’s celebrations on the sidelines, amongst other goals and crowd shots. To emphasise the host country, the stars and stripes adorned the top and bottom bars of the screen. When the music came back round to the bombastic bars of the chorus again, the title sequence was coming to a close with a spinning ball filled with previous World Cup winners lifting the famous trophy. As the track reached a crescendo, the red stripes of the USA flag covered the centre before a ball flew from the bottom right to act as the flag’s ‘stars’, revealing the title card “World Cup ’94”. Below, the titles to the Brazil v Netherlands Quarter Final.


PRESENTATION TEAM

BBC Host BBC Pundits

Desmond Lynam was once more at the helm of the BBC’s World Cup coverage, fronting the opening match, key games and, of course, the Final. As the corporation’s principal football presenter, Lynam had just finished the second season chairing the best of the action from the Premiership on Match of the Day since the Beeb regained the rights to the top flight in 1992. He previously hosted the show’s FA Cup coverage from 1988 and USA 1994 was his fourth FIFA World Cup. Lynam anchored more than just football though, he was a real all-rounder with his work fronting Grandstand and light entertainment shows. Consequently, he was absent for much of the group stage, instead hosting coverage of the Wimbledon Tennis Championships, but was present for the Republic of Ireland games and the latter stages. Bob Wilson deputised. A regular in the studio was pundit Alan Hansen. The Scotsman joined BBC television for the new Premiership rights in 1992, having previously covered European football for Sky as soon as he retired from playing in ’91. He was also heard on BBC Radio Five Live and quickly earned a great reputation for his considered, authoritative and forthright analysis. He made his name playing in the great Liverpool sides as a centre back during the 1970s and 80s, winning everything there was to win. Hansen excelled with his studio work during his first international tournament with the BBC.

BBC Lineker BBC Lineker studio

One of England’s all-time great goalscorers, the 1986 World Cup Golden Boot winner, Gary Lineker earmarked a career in the media once his playing days were over. He made occasional media appearances during previous tournaments, either by doing the TV interviews for England or, once knocked out, appearing on the broadcasts as a guest. He was still a professional during this tournament, plying his trade in Japan for Nagoya Grampus Eight, whom he joined in the summer of 1992. Two injury-hampered seasons followed. He returned to England whenever he could during this spell, enjoying stints on BBC Radio 5 Live and Match of the Day, including the first Premiership version of the programme in August ’92. However, instead of just going down the usual route of punditry, it was clear Lineker also wanted to be in the presenter’s seat. During the build up to the opening match of the tournament – Germany versus Bolivia – he presented a piece to camera previewing some of the big hitters; above left. Back in the studio, host Lynam told us, “We’ll be seeing quite a bit of Gary, of course, over the next couple of weeks or so”, as Lineker’s BBC career began in earnest. He appeared mostly as an analyst for this tournament but would soon go on to front shows once hanging up his boots for good in September of this year.

BBC Wilson BBC Coppell

For now though, the number two football host was Bob Wilson. He had been the host of magazine preview show Football Focus for the past twenty years upon retirement from keeping goal for Arsenal for more than a decade. Wilson made the leap from player to presenter straight away, rather than via the pundit seat, and also hosted Grandstand and Match of the Day during his time with the BBC. He played a major part during the 1994 World Cup whilst number one Des Lynam was engaged with fronting Wimbledon tennis for much of the group stage. Anchoring World Cup proceedings from Television Centre in London allowed Lynam to return to the fold for the bigger group games but it was Wilson who did much of the heavy lifting on both Live and highlight programming. One of the BBC’s recruits for this tournament was former Manchester United and England winger Steve Coppell. The 1977 FA Cup winner had his playing career cut very short due to persistent knee injuries. It stemmed from a terrible challenge in a World Cup qualifier against Hungary in 1981. He struggled through for two years before calling it quits in October ’83 at the age of twenty-eight. The following summer he moved into management and began his relationship with Crystal Palace, managing them for eight years before resigning last year following top flight relegation. Being out of work, he used the summer opportunity to sit in the BBC studio and analyse the World Cup, providing both a player and coaches perspective, but was keen to get back into management.

BBC Venables BBC Hill

Two long-standing members of the BBC team were present once more in the studio. Terry Venables was a familiar face on the corporation since the mid-1980s, appearing on commentary before becoming more established in the pundit role. His playing career was almost exclusively London based, enjoying success from midfield at Chelsea and Tottenham as well as spells at QPR and Crystal Palace. After retiring in 1975 whilst at Palace, he was handed a coaching role with the club before taking over as manager the following year. Since, he’s had spells with former clubs QPR and Spurs as well as taking charge of Spanish giants Barcelona for three years, he was able to combine this with tournament appearances for the BBC. He hadn’t actually taken charge of Tottenham since 1991, instead moving to Chief Executive for two years before being dismissed. In January of this year, he was appointed England manager following Graham Taylor’s notoriously bad campaign culminating in failure to qualify for this tournament. Another regular on the Beeb was the one and only Jimmy Hill. This was his eight World Cup as a broadcaster, stretching back to 1966. He presented Match of the Day for fifteen years from 1973, often with Bob Wilson as co-host, before moving back into the analyst seat when Lynam took the helm in 1988. As the most senior pundit, he was still going strong at the age of sixty-five during this World Cup, featuring on all the big games including the Final. Completing the line-up of regular studio guests for this tournament was former Arsenal and current Leeds defender David O’Leary, shown on our right of the picture, below, with Liam Brady. With Arsenal, the Irishman won all domestic honours; League, FA Cup, League Cup and Charity Shield. He won sixty-eight caps for the Republic of Ireland and played at the previous World Cup in 1990. After joining Leeds last summer and starting the campaign well, a serious achilles injury kept him out of action for most of the 93/94 season. It was something he would not recover from and, although officially in rehabilitation on the books of Leeds, he would never play again.

BBC Brady and OLeary

Whilst the studio team were all based in London, the commentary was done on-site in America. Co-commentators utilised for this Cup were number one Trevor Brooking, along with Irish representation in the form of Liam Brady; shown in the picture, above, on the left. Brooking was celebrating a decade on-air with the BBC having joined after finishing his playing career, appearing over half a century of matches for West Ham’s midfield. He appeared both in studio for Match of the Day and was first choice as Live match summariser, commentating across both BBC radio and television during his media career. Former Republic of Ireland midfielder Liam Brady was covering his second consecutive World Cup for the BBC, both featuring his national side. After retiring from playing in 1990 he managed Celtic from the following year before joining his current post at Brighton and Hove Albion in 1993. Unfortunately for Brady, both spells have been marred by financial trouble at the top and poor form on the pitch. He was co-commentator for all Ireland’s matches as well as select others during the tournament. Providing a current player’s view from the gantry were John Fashanu and Chris Waddle. With Fashanu in the final couple of seasons of his playing career, he was looking for media roles. When ITV sporting entertainment giant Gladiators launched in the UK in 1992, he was host alongside Ulrika Jonsson and launched his catchphrase ‘Awooga!’ into the public conscience. He attracted controversy during his career both on and off the field. On it, his elbow during the 93/94 season fractured Tottenham captain Gary Mabbutt’s eye in a sickening clash. Off it, he publicly denounced his own brother Justin for coming out as gay in 1990, a decision he later regretted. John Fashanu’s finest day in football came when, as John Motson put it, ‘the Crazy Gang beat the Culture Club’ to win the 1988 FA Cup with underdogs Wimbledon, defeating Liverpool by a goal to nil. He spent the last eight years with the Dons but would move to Aston Villa after the World Cup for his final season before retirement. His struggled to take to co-commentary, with his fellow broadcaster having to pick up a lot of the slack during matches, confined mostly to the midnight BST kick-offs.

BBC Davies

Leading the BBC’s commentary team for his one – and sadly, only – Live World Cup Final as number one was Barry Davies; above, seen hosting the BBC’s Review of the Tournament from December ’94. He celebrated twenty-five years at the BBC in July. After serving as number two behind John Motson for so long, he was rewarded with this summer’s showpiece climax, having had experience on European club Finals during the 1970s and 80s and the 1972 European Championships Final between USSR and West Germany. This meant John Motson would have to settle for second best in 1994, including sharing Republic of Ireland duties with Davies on one Live game apiece. Motson did get to do the BBC’s Semi Final as well as the likes of USA’s first match, Brazil, Germany and Italy games too. The pair covered eighteen of the BBC’s twenty Live matches between them, leaving the other commentators to pick up the remaining couple of games as well as the non-Live ones for highlights. Clive Tyldesley was the man getting the nod for the other two Live fixtures, having joined from ITV in the summer of 1992. This was ahead of the relaunched Premiership Match of the Day, getting the chance to voice top flight fixtures on a regular basis as well as voiceovers and reports across the sporting output. Tony Gubba first covered a World Cup for the corporation in 1974, commentating on every tournament since. Owing to the large travel distances across the States, a fifth voice was needed to cover the highlights. Gerald Sinstadt, who moved over from ITV in the mid-80s, was chosen. As well as commentating, he was a familiar voice to the MotD goal round-ups at the end of the programmes.

BBC Studio 2

Fulfilling the roles of reporter in the USA were Ray Stubbs, Hazel Irvine and Garth Crooks. Stubbs started with the BBC in 1983 on local radio as a presenter and commentator before moving to Manchester after three years to produce. It was as a producer that he went to Italia ’90, for investigative sports programme On the Line, and since the formation of the Premiership he too voiced round-ups as well as touchline reports for Live FA Cup fixtures. He followed the fortunes of the Republic of Ireland from their US camp this summer. Hazel Irvine was another transfer from ITV, following the 1990 competition where she reported from the Scotland camp. At the age of twenty-eight, she became the youngest ever presenter of Grandstand in June ’93. Crooks was previously in the studio as an analyst for the 1982, ’86 and ’90 tournaments but was dispatched around America to showcase the vibrancy and atmosphere of the competition this time round.


LIVE MATCH SELECTION

BBC Sport broadcast a total of twenty Live matches during the USA 1994 World Cup, kicking off the tournament with the opener featuring holders Germany and concluding with the Brazil versus Italy Final. They showed the Republic of Ireland’s final group match with Norway which saw Jack Charlton’s men progress to the knockout stages. Whilst ITV front-loaded the tournament, the BBC had control over the picks for the knockouts, selecting the best potential clashes including the first choice UK prime-time Semi Final, Ireland’s Second Round defeat to the Netherlands on Independence Day and the Quarter Finals of both Germany and Brazil. Their coverage, although UK based, was much better received than ITV’s Dallas location.

GROUP STAGES; Friday 17th June
Germany 1-0 Bolivia (8pm Kick Off)

Saturday 18th June
USA 1-1 Switzerland (4.30pm) & Romania 3-1 Colombia (Midnight)

Sunday 19th June
Cameroon 2-2 Sweden (Midnight)

Monday 20th June
Brazil 2-0 Russia (9pm)

Tuesday 21st June
Nigeria 3-0 Bulgaria (Midnight)

Thursday 23rd June
Italy 1-0 Norway (9pm)

Friday 24th June
Brazil 3-0 Cameroon (9pm)

Saturday 25th June
Argentina 2-1 Nigeria (9pm)

Monday 27th June
Germany 3-2 South Korea (9pm)

Tuesday 28th June
Rep of Ireland 0-0 Norway (5.30pm)

Thursday 30th June
Bulgaria 2-0 Argentina (Midnight)

LAST 16; Saturday 2nd July
Germany 3-2 Belgium (6pm)

Sunday 3rd July
Romania 3-2 Argentina (9.30pm)

Monday 4th July
Netherlands 2-0 Rep of Ireland (5pm)

Tuesday 5th July
Bulgaria 1-1 Mexico, AET – BUL win 3-1 on penalties (9.30pm)

QUARTER FINALS; Saturday 9th July
Brazil 3-2 Netherlands (8.30pm)

Sunday 10th July
Germany 1-2 Bulgaria (5pm)

SEMI FINALS; Wednesday 13th July
Italy 2-1 Bulgaria (9pm)

FINAL; Sunday 17th July
Brazil 0-0 Italy, AET – BRA win 3-2 on penalties (8.30pm)


COVERAGE & GRAPHICS

BBC Ident BBC Sport Ident

When the BBC 1 ident came on followed by that iconic BBC Sport sting, you knew you were in for a treat. Above left; this set of BBC idents came in back in February 1991 and was their second major international football tournament, following the 1992 European Championships. Known as the ‘virtual globes’, the circle rotated around the numerical 1 in the centre. The BBC Sport ident followed, with that classic jingle that will surely now be playing in the heads of those of a certain vintage at the very sight of that image; above right. The gold tinge of the ‘nucleus’ around another rotating globe came in for major events beginning with the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, with this ’94 World Cup their international football tournament debut.

BBC Studio BBC Opening Ceremony

Coverage was hosted from Television Centre for all matches bar the Final, when Des and the team travelled out to the States to present on-site. Above left; the establishing shot of the sofa studio, taken from the opening match between Germany and Bolivia. Joining Lynam in the studio were principal analysts Alan Hansen and Jimmy Hill. Above right; the panel behind Lynam was a television screen, allowing Live pictures to be shown behind him as he and the panel discussed the match. In the example, the Opening Ceremony was about to begin. There were two studio sets used during the coverage of the World Cup, the main sofa area is shown above. A desk and chair set was also used, as detailed further down the page.

BBC Final Italy BBC Final Brazil

The host broadcaster provided graphics ahead of, and during, the match for channels all over the world to use. This included the team line ups as shown above. Their graphics were on a translucent blue panel with italic white text. The official tournament logo was incorporated in, with the white dots underlining the headings and the striped ribbons of the US flag appearing in the background. Above left; the Italian line up in numerical order for the Final. Above right; the Brazilian starting XI for the Final laid out in formation, shown after the numerical list as the commentator talked us through the players. These graphics would fade or appear in, with little animation or fanfare. Considering these were US graphics, they were rather simplistic and understated.

Aston 1 Replay transition 2

In-play graphics were also provided by the host broadcaster across all of BBC, ITV and Eurosport. Above left; the world feed name aston for Italian talisman Roberto Baggio. Again, this featured the blue panels with white dots and italic text. The addition of the flag and three letter country code was placed on the right, whilst a yellow number appeared left of the name to indicate the squad number. Above right; the replay transition as we returned to Live action. Replay pictures flew in from the left of screen with a thick white border. Once complete, the replay flew back out towards the right of screen as shown. This was the case throughout the tournament other than the Final, where the fixture adorned the border instead.

BBC Scorebar

This was the first international tournament where the BBC provided a permanent on-screen scoreboard and clock. With occasional experiments using this on other sports during the 1980s, a scoreboard became a permanent fixture on the football coverage in this country when Sky Sports launched in the early 1990s. The BBC took to the idea in the 1993/94 season for their UEFA Cup broadcasts and deployed it for this World Cup. Above; similar to that of ITVs, the BBC logo appeared in the top left of the screen with the clock underneath and the scoreline to the right. The timer appeared within a translucent box whilst the fixture was in a yellow italic font. This formula remained a constant throughout the rest of the decade, with only a few minor tweaks along the way.

BBC graphics BBC Sub

The host broadcaster’s graphics did not stretch to a permanent scoreboard, instead using the more familiar approach from previous tournaments of flashing up the clock and score at intervals. Above left; this would sometimes lead to slight conflictions between the exact seconds of the timer, with this example showing the BBC clock two seconds ahead of the official one. The graphics on the blue panel with the white dots would appear all around the world at the same time. Above right; for substitutions the host broadcaster graphics would appear on screen and indicate the player coming on and off with a little “In” or “Out” signal on the left accompanied by an animated arrow.

BBC Aston BBC Standings

The BBC did use their own graphics for coverage outside of the Live match. Above left; BBC aston captioning Ireland’s goalscorer over Italy, Ray Houghton’s. The blue background and italic white text fitted with the World Cup branding, whilst the trophy was added to the left and further text written in light blue. The graphics faded in and out. Above right; full screen graphics with very much a blue theme. This was after that Irish win opened their campaign. The BBC Sport globe and corporation logo adorned the bottom corner of the screen.

BBC Score astonBBC Coming Up

Further examples of the BBC’s own graphics are shown here, again using that blue panel background. Above left; during the highlights of the Nigeria v Italy match, a caption appeared signifying the progression into the Extra Time period. Above right; at the conclusion of the Live match programme, the coverage would usually end with a graphic detailing the next World Cup programming on the BBC. In this case, highlights show World Cup Report would be on air from 11.25pm.

BBC Rule Changes BBC Rules 2

Ahead of the tournament, there were genuine fears that it being held in America would change the game for the worse; with reports of the game being split into quarters rather than halves for advertising purposes, lots of gimmicks and would the supporters even know what was going on. It’s fair to say those never materialised and the tournament was the best attended to date. However, some big rule changed did come into effect. The most positive, as outlined during the BBC’s build up to the opener (above left), saw three points awarded for a win rather than two. The complaint about Italia ’90 was too many dull, defensive matches and not enough attacking prowess. The group stage alone saw ten one-nil victories and eight draws. The additional point for a win was a bid to encourage more teams to go for victory. Elsewhere we saw the introduction of names on the back of shirts, and additional substitution allowed and the possibility of video evidence determining if a suspension should stand or not. The referees were also encouraged to look out for certain things to punish as well as yet another interpretation of the offside law; above right. Other directives were to give the attack the benefit of the doubt over tight offsides, timewasting reduced to a minimum and the introduction of an electric cart! Technology was there and they were going to use it. All whilst refereeing in something other than the traditional black uniforms.

BBC Studio 3

Whilst the previously mentioned sofa area was the main set used by the BBC for coverage of this tournament, there was also a large desk area too, as shown above. In this example, host Bob Wilson is joined by pundit Steve Coppell and comedic guests Frank Skinner and David Baddiel. The pair were dressed in the unique style of USA defender Alexi Lalas. The desk would often feature on highlights programming, Grandstand and more formal broadcasts, whilst the sofa was more utilised on Live matches. During the regular season, Match of the Day’s set was like the above, featuring pundits either side of the large table. The three-coloured BBC logo was unmistakable at the front.


FEATURES & SUPPORT PROGRAMMING

Diana Ross Opening Ceremony 1 Opening Ceremony 2

The BBC showed Live coverage of the tournament’s opening ceremony in Chicago, during their build-up to Germany versus Bolivia. If people had their doubts about the Americanisation of soccer, there could surely be no doubts that they knew how to put on a show. You knew it was going to be good when someone had the bright idea of inviting comedian Robin Williams on with FIFA general secretary Sepp Blatter to conduct the group draw. The ceremony was the usual mix of colour and noise, compered by television superstar Oprah Winfrey. The show introduced each country in their individual traditional dances, such as samba for Brazil and Irish dancing for the Republic (above, bottom left), there was a performance of the official tournament song – also ITV’s theme tune – by Darry Hall and The Sounds of Blackness; above, bottom right. But the standout moment came right at the start when legendary Motown singer Diana Ross kicked it all off. Wearing oversized red jacket and trousers, she ran the length of the pitch, through a parade of dancers and performers, whilst singing her classic hit “I’m Coming Out”. The intended culmination was for her to score a penalty kick which would catapult the goal frame to split in half and launch the ceremony. What actually happened was one of the most memorable moments of any opening ceremony anywhere, but for the wrong reasons. After playing to the crowds, Ross stuttered her run up, toying with the goalkeeper before slicing her shot horribly wide (above, top)! As the old adage states; the show must go on. The nets collapsed as if it was all still going to plan and Diana Ross ran through onto the stage for the next part of her performance. Seamless. She did not reign Supreme on this occasion.

Baddiel and Skinner 1 Baddiel and Skinner 2

BBC Studio 4

Comedians David Baddiel and Frank Skinner came to prominence during 1994 for their hit late-night BBC 2 television programme Fantasy Football League. The programme ran weekly on Friday nights from January and was a mix of comedy, sketches and discussion around the Premiership centred around Fantasy Football; the idea of choosing a team of players from the League, earning points for goals, assists and clean sheets amongst other things and competing against others in a League table, first popularised in the mainstream in the 1990s in England. Celebrity guests would come on to the show during the series and discuss their team of players, but it was also an excuse to show some funny clips from football and take the mickey out of it. As a result of the immediate popularity of the show, Baddiel and Skinner were invited onto the final day edition of Match of the Day as pundits alongside Des Lynam in May and did a good enough job to be asked back for appearances during the World Cup. They made a handful of cameos during the post-match coverage of some of the late-night Live group matches, sitting alongside the regular pundits. Their remit was to provide a lighter look at the tournament as they did on Fantasy Football League, using funny clips and making jokes. Quite brilliantly, during the closing credits after the World Cup Final, their names appeared in the list of pundits alongside the likes of Hansen, Hill and Lineker!

BBC Goal of the Tournament BBC Maradona report

A tradition of previous Cups was the Goal of the Tournament vote. BBC viewers were asked to call in to vote for their favourite from the shortlist of ten provided, which included new Tottenham signing Jurgen Klinsmann’s effort against the Koreans; above left. Following the huge news that Argentinian star Diego Maradona had failed a drugs test at the tournament and would be banned, BBC One broadcast a special twenty-five-minute programme before their coverage of Argentina’s final group match, against Bulgaria, documenting his story. Above right; Bob Wilson voiced ‘Maradona – A Special Report’ which featured archive footage, news reports and interviews. This was eight years on from his infamous ‘Hand of God’ goal in the 1986 World Cup against England, so the development sparked little sympathy from the British broadcasters and provided Baddiel and Skinner with further comedy ammo.


THE FINAL

Coverage of the last match on BBC One was hosted Live from the stadium as Des Lynam attended his first World Cup Final in person. Des’s previous tournament finales had been hosted from the BBC Studio in London. He was accompanied by Jimmy Hill and Alan Hansen in a cramped box which was presumably too small to also include Terry Venables. He instead found himself sat away from his fellow pundits and up on the gantry providing his thoughts when asked by Lynam during the pre- and post-match broadcast.

BRAZIL 0-0 ITALY (AET, BRA win 3-2 on pens) World Cup 1994 Final, Los Angeles
Sunday 17th July 1994, 8.30pm Kick Off BBC One Logo

BBC Final Studio BBC Final CreditsBBC Final Credits 2

PRESENTER Des Lynam GUESTS Jimmy Hill, Alan Hansen & Terry Venables
COMMENTATORS Barry Davies & Trevor Brooking
Hosted from the Rose Bowl, California     8.15-11pm Live on BBC One (Extended to approx 11.35pm)

Trophy Lift

For details on ITV’s World Cup 1994 coverage click HERE.

#7: Brighton Women 0-4 Arsenal Women 12/01/2020

#7 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0-4 ARSENAL WOMEN Women’s Super League
Sunday 12th January 2020 LIVE via Red Button

ARSW Intro

COMMENTATOR Vicki Sparks CO-COMMENTATOR Gemma Fay
REPORTER Patrick Austen-Hardy HALF TIME Eilidh Barbour & Jayne Ludlow
12.30pm Kick Off; People’s Pension Stadium, Crawley     12.20-2.30pm Live on BBC Red Button

ARSW Table ARSW Arrivals ARSW Arsenal arrivals

Context of the Match: Since Brighton’s last Live televised appearance, the five-nil loss at high-flying Manchester City in December, just one match had been played since the Christmas break. Last week, Brighton secured their second Women’s Super League victory of the season in an absolutely crucial game with Liverpool. Midfielder Aileen Whelan nabbed the solitary goal as Albion ran out one-nil winners, turning the ball home from close range following Lea Le Garrec’s cushioned header back. The victory put Brighton on nine points from ten games into ninth place but, more importantly, created a six-point gap between them and bottom of the table Liverpool. With only one team relegated again this season, this was a big opening as we entered the second half of the campaign today against table-topping Arsenal. The Gunners led the way, and would go back to being three points clear of Manchester City with a win today, as City played a day earlier to level things up in terms of points, goal difference and goals scored! Brighton did record a victory, of sorts, over Arsenal back in November in the Continental Cup group stages. After drawing nil-nil, to decide the match winner and a bonus point, the format of the competition meant a penalty shoot-out followed. Albion’s Kirsty Barton stepped up first but fired wide. Goalkeeper Sophie Harris kept it level when saving Arsenal’s first penalty from Kim Little. Kayleigh Green then converted to give Albion the lead in the shoot-out. Kirsty McCabe equalised before Maya Le Tissier restored the Brighton advantage. England striker Beth Mead blazed her kick over the bar and Dani Bowman converted to extend the Brighton lead to three-one. Danielle van de Donk squeezed the ball into the corner to pull one back but Lea Le Garrec scored the fifth and final penalty to secure the bonus point for Brighton, winning the shoot-out four-two. Brighton enjoyed more success in this competition than they had enjoyed so far in the WSL. A three-nil victory at Charlton kicked off the competition, with two goals from Kayleigh Green and one from Ini Umotong. A defeat at home to Bristol City hampered progress but after the Arsenal shoot-out win, the group concluded with back to back wins in the capital ensured progress to the knockout rounds where they were handed a difficult trip to Manchester United. Those two victories were high scoring ones; beating London Bees five-nil with five different scorers. Amanda Nilden, Victoria Williams, Emily Simpkins, Ini Umotong and Kate Natkiel all got in on the act. The final group game was a four-two win at London City Lionesses, where Matilde Lundorf, Umotong again, Emily Simpkins and an own goal secured progress. Looking ahead, the Women’s FA Cup draw had been made during the week. Brighton were handed a trip to Aston Villa for their Fourth Round last-32 tie. Villa were unbeaten and top of the second-tier Championship and a chance to test themselves against another in-form side. The WSL though was a whole different prospect but the Seagulls could go into today’s televised clash with Champions Arsenal with a bit more belief than before. The BBC cameras were present in Crawley to showcase the Albion Women Live on the Red Button.

ARSW Brighton ARSW Arsenal

The Teams: Hope Powell handed new deals to two of Albion’s women this week; goalkeeper Megan Walsh and midfielder Maya Le Tissier, her first professional contract. Whilst the former started here, the latter missed out. Walsh’s place was perhaps under threat after the club signed Norway international ‘keeper Cecille Fiskerstrand, with three now competing for the starting place. Defender Fliss Gibbons was an automatic starter. Returning to the starting XI as one of two changes was Victoria Williams. Prior to joining the Albion in 2018, Williams played for the Great Britain university football team win a gold medal in the 2013 Summer Universiade in Russia. Brighton’s longest serving player, Kirsty Barton, returned to the starting XI. Barton joined from Chelsea in 2011, making over 150 appearances for the Seagulls on the rise from the third tier to the top. Midfielder Emily Simpkins was featuring in her second season at the club, having joined from the now defunct Doncaster Rovers Belles and becoming their first player to be given a professional contract back in 2015. The other change from the Liverpool victory saw twenty-one-year-old Amanda Nilden come in for Kate Natkiel. Nilden represented Sweden at under 17, U19 and U23 level. Whilst Lea Le Garrec worked her way up the French youth levels, including winning the under-19 European Championships in 2010, before earning a senior international cap seven years later. Welsh striker Kayleigh Green’s two goals and one assist have been invaluable in Albion’s few wins this campaign. Before Brighton, Green played in the UEFA Women’s Champions League for Cardiff and played for Italian Serie B side Chieti. Goalscoring prowess on the bench included the only woman to score in a Live televised Brighton match, Ini Umotong, as well as Irish striker Megan Connolly and Kate Natkiel, who began her career in the Arsenal under-10s before progressing through the age groups.

Arsenal boss Joe Montemurro opted for a three-four-three formation. Their star player is the sensational striker Vivianne Miedema, who has fourteen goals and eight assists to her name in the WSL this campaign thus far. Centre-back and captain Leah Williamson came up through Arsenal’s youth ranks and represented England at under-15, U17, U19, U20 and U23 level before making her senior debut in the World Cup 2019 qualifier in Russia back in 2018. Her first goal for her country came last November, a late winner in a three-two result against the Czech Republic. Alongside her in defence for Arsenal was Republic of Ireland international Louise Quinn, who joined in 2017 and signed a new contract ahead of this season. Manuela Zinsberger returned to the first team in goal. In midfield, Jordan Nobbs, Kim Little and Danielle van de Donk all netted in the reverse fixture in September as Arsenal ran out four-nil winners against the Albion for the third League match in succession. The trio all started again here. Dutch international Jill Roord joined in May ahead of the Women’s World Cup, where she scored the only goal in the Netherlands win over New Zealand. Switzerland’s Lia Walti completed the quintet across the middle. Amongst the options on the sidelines were England striker Beth Mead, who scored the goal of the season when the sides last met in Sussex in the WSL back in April, and German defender Leonie Maier who joined for this season. The referee in charge was Kirsty Dowle.

ARSW Kick Off ARSW Comms ARSW Barbour and Ludlow

Presentation Team: Vicki Sparks led the BBC Red Button commentary, voicing her third Albion Women’s match Live and the second time it’s been against Arsenal. She combined her WSL schedule with reports for Final Score and Premier League and FA Cup commentaries for Match of the Day. Alongside her in Crawley was the former Scotland goalkeeper Gemma Fay. She retired in 2017 having been capped by Scotland a phenomenal two-hundred-and-three times over nineteen years, a record high for any British footballer. Fay captained the National side from 2009 and was earmarked for a place in Team GB’s 2012 Olympic squad, missing out behind Karen Bardsley and Rachel Brown-Finnis. She did make it to the 2017 European Championships in the Netherlands. Fay’s club career began in her native Scotland with St Johnstone, Aberdeen and Ayr before moving down to England. At the age of twenty-one, she joined Brighton Women for the 2002/03 season before returning North to Hibernian. Seven years were spent at Celtic Ladies, during which time she also turned her hand to acting for the lead role in one-off Sky drama Rubenesque. Since retirement she expanded on her media appearances, travelling to France for the Women’s World Cup coverage with the BBC in 2019 where she was a key member of the punditry team providing a Scottish angle. Reporting on the touchline was Patrick Austen-Hardy. A new name to this website and to televised sports broadcasting, Austen-Hardy was employed by production company Whisper for today’s match and others over the previous eighteen months, as it’s Whisper who dispatch the WSL Live match reporters. His previous work showcases a lot of written articles for a variety of online publications such as La Liga News and Ronnie Dog Media. As of this season he worked as Swindon Town’s media assistant and contributed to Southampton Solent University’s website, where he was completing his education. Present at pitchside in situ for The Women’s Football Show later in the evening were host Eilidh Barbour and pundit Jayne Ludlow. The pair also contributed to the half-time discussion. Barbour was one of the regular rotating hosts of the show and combined that with other BBC Sport work across football and golf, and was Sky’s Scottish football presenter this year, maternity cover for Hayley McQueen. Jayne Ludlow was a regular contributor to the BBC’s WSL coverage, both as a guest or co-commentating. The Wales manager previously called Brighton’s Live WSL clash at Arsenal, the reverse of today’s fixture back in September.

ARSW Fixtures ARSW Powell ARSW One to Watch ARSW One to Watch Arsenal

The Coverage: The second weekend of the new decade saw the second round of the Women’s Super League take place after the pause for the Christmas period. Ten minutes before the scheduled 12.30pm kick off, the BBC Red Button coverage came on-air. Commentator Vicki Sparks handled proceedings out-of-vision. She introduced the day’s fixtures with the featured match being in Crawley as the Champions came to town. One match had already taken place the day before, Live on BT Sport, as challengers Manchester City kept up the pace with Arsenal by defeating Everton by three goals to one. Elsewhere, a waterlogged pitch put pay to Liverpool versus Manchester United but still going ahead after the Albion’s match would be a London derby between Tottenham and West Ham, Reading faced Birmingham whilst the other hopefuls in the title race, Chelsea, hosted Bristol City. A look at the table saw how close things were at the top of the table, with Arsenal only top because of alphabetical order over Manchester City – with everything else level but Arsenal had played a game less. Shots of the two teams arriving into the People’s Pension Stadium in Sussex followed, getting off the team bus and into the reception area. We heard from both bosses ahead of kick off, speaking with our reporter Patrick Austen-Hardy. Brighton manager Hope Powell said the result from the previous Cup match against Arsenal would give confidence despite it being just a memory now; “It was a long time ago but we have to take heart from that. Obviously a really good performance from us, more importantly to win the game – albeit on penalties.” Arsenal’s Joe Montemurro spent a couple of weeks away from the squad to return to his native Australia last month but was back ready to take the team again as the season hotted up. With the news that Manchester City were losing their coach Nick Cushing to America next month, it was important to keep focus on the task ahead. “Every game’s got its own particular situation,” he said, “we don’t really look at what other teams are doing, we look at how we can improve and how we can be the best we can be.” Sparks introduced us to former Albion goalkeeper and Scotland’s record appearance holder, co-commentator Gemma Fay. They pair focussed on a couple of players to watch out for, starting with the current Brighton goalie Megan Walsh who was celebrating a contract extension this week. Fay said of Walsh, “She’s started, I think, all but one game and as a goalkeeper to be midway through a season, having just arrived at a club and to be offered that contract extension must give her great confidence.” Unsurprisingly the Arsenal one to watch was of course the WSL’s record scorer Vivianne Miedema. And with that, the teams were ready in the tunnel for kick off.

ARSW Half Time 1 ARSW Half Time 2 ARSW Half Time 3 ARSW Half Time 4

As usual with these broadcasts, the half time break is the most feature filled. The interval began with the commentary team looking back at the goals and key chances from the first half, in which Arsenal led by two goals to nil. Co-commentator Gemma Fay focussed on praising the attacking play for the goal, calling the first “a delightful finish”, but more critical of Brighton’s left side for the second as Williamson had time and space to pick a pass, likewise van de Donk for the shot. Next, we saw highlights from the only WSL game played on Saturday, as Manchester City defeated Everton. The game was Live on BT Sport and their commentary team of Adam Summerton and Lucy Ward voiced the best bits at the Academy Stadium. A regular half time feature this season on the BBC coverage has been the ‘Getting to Know’ segment, where each club had a player interviewed by twins Rosie and Molly Kmita. The chat took place on a golf buggy, for some reason, but allowed for a more casual environment. This time, West Ham’s Adriana Leon was the player involved. The Canadian international joined the Hammers a year ago. Supporting her fellow countryman, Leon revealed she was a fan of Justin Bieber. Shame. The final part of the half time break saw us head down pitchside to link up with the team fronting the evening’s highlights on The Women’s Football Show; Eilidh Barbour and Jayne Ludlow. Speaking from a tactical perspective, the former Arsenal woman noticed two key points; the use of Leah Williamson on the right almost acting as a right-winger at times, and the early switching of the play over to the left to utilise Danielle van de Donk. She emphasised the collectiveness this Arsenal group have; “There’s a team ethic that runs through this team whether they’ve got the ball or whether they haven’t got the ball, they work extremely hard for each other.” They also picked up on the slightly bobbly conditions of the Crawley pitch, with big soil divots dotted around the surface. After the match there was just enough time for Eilidh Barbour to grab a quick word with Gemma Fay’s Player of the Match; Leah Williamson. The Arsenal and England defender was involved in assisting the goals and put in a terrific shift. With a further reminder pushing us towards the magazine show later on in the evening, it was time for Vicki Sparks to wrap the broadcast up as, once again, Arsenal defeated the Albion on the telly.

ARSW Teams ARSW Opening goal ARSW Second goal

Story of the Match: Brighton’s Lea Le Garrec got the game underway, with the Seagulls kicking from left to right in the first half in the familiar stripes of blue and white. Arsenal wore their change kit of yellow shirts and socks with blue shorts. Brighton would have been aware of Arsenal’s ability to fly out of the blocks and score early, having inflicted that on the Albion in previous meetings. So, it was a disappointing start to the game when the deadlock was broken just three minutes in. Having just tried a crossfield ball from right to left in a bid to set van de Donk free moments earlier by Jordan Nobbs, this time Leah Williamson measured the skill to perfection. Her pass from effectively the right centre-back position sailed over the head of Albion full-back Kirsty Barton to set van de Donk in behind. She took three touches to drive into the box and showed terrific strength to outmuscle Barton as she attempted to track back. As she approached the six-yard line, the Dutch midfielder stroked the ball past Megan Walsh’s near post to strike an early blow. The finish described as “cool” by commentator Vicki Sparks, whilst summariser Gemma Fay believed Brighton allowed it to be a bit too easy for Arsenal. Williamson was enjoying a lot of freedom down the right-hand side, charging up and down the touchline for both defensive and attacking duties. The next chance came as a result of another marauding run from the English defender. Her pass down the line allowed Lisa Evans to get forward to cross into the danger area. Jordan Nobbs completely missed her kick but the ball fell to Jill Roord behind her just inside the box. She took a touch to steady it before trying to curl round the defence. Dani Kerkdijk’s foot deflected the shot up and Walsh had to scramble around on the line to collect under pressure from Miedema. After the half hour mark it was to be two-nil, this time Roord wasn’t to be denied. Again, it was Williamson who provided the assist, receiving the ball out wide and delivering the perfect pass between the two central defenders and into the area where Roord found space. Her finish gave Walsh no chance, just guiding the ball into the other corner of the net as it bounced up nicely for the hit. The Albion defence weren’t close enough to her and paid the price. Arsenal’s quick play and switching from one flank to the other caused all sorts of problems for Brighton, almost resulting in a third from Nobbs, instead landing just the other side of the post. However, there was one decent opportunity for the home side which arrived as we approached the break. Aileen Whelan played a fantastic through ball to cut out three Arsenal defenders and find Emily Simpkins. Her first touch just took it a little wide and struggled to get the ball out of her feet. As a result, she had to take the shot a little off balance and with the covering defender now back in position the effort ended up wide of the target. Just a one-off or something of a warning sign that the Seagulls weren’t out of it just yet? The first half drew to a close with the scoreline at nil-two.

ARSW Third Goal ARSW Fourth goal ARSW Player of the Match

Into the second half, it didn’t take Arsenal long to extend that lead further after some very neat interchanges over on the far side. Just six minutes in, Jordan Nobbs netted to make it three-nil. Leah Williamson spread the play from the centre to the left where it soon found Danielle van de Donk. Her low ball into the mixer was expertly dummied by Miedema to allow Nobbs to run onto it. She only needed a touch with the right then a shot with the left to slot the ball home and seal the three points. Gemma Fay on commentary was wowed by the passing play from the Gunners in the build-up. With this the first of three games for the visitors in around a week, substitutions were made to keep the legs fresh. England’s Beth Mead was brought on for Kim Little and the striker didn’t waste her opportunity when it was presented. Lia Walti’s ball forward seemed neither a cross nor shot and should have been a routine take for goalkeeper Megan Walsh. However, the bounce just in front of her made it that little bit more difficult and she spilled the ball at the feet of another substitute, Leonie Maier. In a desperate attempt to regain the ball, Walsh dived out and brought Maier down, who was first to the loose ball. If it hadn’t fallen to an Arsenal woman, referee Kirsty Dowle would have pointed to the spot. Alas, there was no need as Beth Mead firmly struck the ball into the open net to round things off in the final minute. The three previous meetings in the Women’s Super League had all finished four-nil to Arsenal. An unusually goal quiet Vivianne Miedema tried to break that sequence to add a fifth in stoppage time but her lob over the onrushing Walsh from the edge of the box landed just over. So, it was to be a fourth successive four-nil League victory for the Champions. Brighton disappointingly didn’t muster a shot on target in the ninety minutes and lacked the pace and level of quality that Arsenal brought to the game from the off. They restored their three-point cushion at the top of the table, whilst Brighton knew their biggest result was actually the week before by widening the gap between themselves and the foot of the table to six points. It wouldn’t be a comfortable end to the season just yet, but the hard yards would be fought against the teams around them rather than the elite few such as today’s opposition.

ARSW Full Time.JPG

BRIGHTON WOMEN 0 ARSENAL WOMEN 4
van de Donk, Roord, Nobbs, Mead

ARSW Replay

PREVIOUS; #6 MANCHESTER CITY WOMEN 5-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN 15/12/2019

NEXT; #8

#6: Manchester City Women 5-0 Brighton Women 15/12/2019

#6 MAN CITY WOMEN 5-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN Women’s Super League
Sunday 15th December 2019 LIVE via Red Button

MCW Intro

COMMENTATOR Vicki Sparks CO-COMMENTATOR Faye White
REPORTER Kelly Somers
12.30pm Kick Off; Academy Stadium, Manchester     12.20-2.30pm Live on BBC Red Button

MCW Fixtures  MCW Table

Context of the Match: The Women’s Super League broadcasters, BBC and BT Sport, did not like to pick matches where Brighton would be in with a shout of three points! Today was the Albion’s sixth Live match to be shown on television, with three of the previous five coming against Champions Arsenal and the latest showing was away at FA Cup holders Manchester City. Formed in 1988 as Manchester City Ladies, they spent the first ten years bumping around the North West Regional Football Leagues and then the subsequent years towards the bottom of Women’s Premier League. They didn’t gain prominence until the big shake up of English women’s football and the formation of the WSL. City missed out on a place initially in 2010 but applied again three years later, this time successfully, when the FA expanded the League into two tiers comprising a total of eighteen clubs. That was the point that Manchester City Women as we know it today really began, with a place in the top tier of the WSL for the start of 2014. A complete reform of the playing squad saw a number of England internationals flock, most notably goalkeeper Karen Bardsley, midfielder Jill Scott and captain Steph Houghton join new manager Nick Cushing. In the years since, they’ve won the League, two FA Cups and three League Cups as well as competing in Europe to become one of English women’s football’s most successful sides. Ahead of today’s game they sat in third, three points off the top. Whilst City were claiming trophies, Brighton were building to reach the point where they were here; playing as a fully professional club against the likes of City, Arsenal and Chelsea. The Albion Women’s last televised match came at the home of the Champions back in September, losing by four goals to nil. Since that afternoon, there were back to back League defeats to West Ham and Everton in a dreadful October. November began more brightly, particularly in the Continental Cup with a shoot-out victory over Arsenal the highlight. In the middle was the inaugural ‘Women’s Football Weekend’, taking place across Sunday 17th November during the international break in men’s football. Similar to the opening weekend, many WSL clubs played at men’s stadiums, with The Amex hosting Albion versus Birmingham. A sensational three-nil scoreline saw Brighton’s first WSL win of the season as Kayleigh Green’s brace and Lea Le Garrec’s first goal capped a memorable day. The Seagulls couldn’t capitalise on this momentum, going down four-nil at Manchester United and drawing two-two with Reading as a last-gasp equaliser cost Brighton all three points for the second time this campaign. There was a defeat to promoted Tottenham last week, but the progress to the knockout stages of the Continental Cup was capped off in style; beating London City Lionesses four-two on Wednesday. All this left Brighton tenth in the WSL table, two places and four points away from the sole relegation spot, and a trip to Manchester United awaited in the knockout stage of the League Cup. This afternoon’s trip to Manchester to face City was the final game in a relatively positive 2019. The BBC Red Button broadcast the match Live for some pre-Christmas football.

MCW Man City MCW Brighton

The Teams: The big team news from an Albion point of view was a change in goal, as Megan Walsh was dropped in favour of Sophie Harris. The former London Bees ‘keeper joined Brighton joined in 2018 and made her League debut against today’s opposition back in February. She went on to win the PFA Fans Player of the Month. In front of her, the familiar backline of Fliss Gibbons and Victoria Williams combined with summer signings Danique Kerkdijk and Matilde Lundorf this season. Another new face this year, French midfielder Lea Le Garrec, provided a touch of class in the middle. Aileen Whelan scored against title-chasing Chelsea back in September and opened the Brighton scoring in the recent two-all draw with Reading. Dani Bowman scored a consolation goal against Manchester City in January, during the crushing seven-one defeat in the League Cup. Left-sided winger Emily Simpkins netted in last month’s Continental Cup win at London Bees but is yet to get off the mark in the WSL. Welsh forward Kayleigh Green has five goals to her name this season, whilst Ini Umotong has four. Attacking options off the bench include Irishwoman Megan Connolly, who scored a consolation in the three-one defeat at home to West Ham. Sweden’s Amanda Nilden and England’s Maya Le Tissier also posed a threat in the final third. Missing from the squad was injured defender Fern Whelan joining long-term absentee Laura Rafferty on the sidelines.

Nick Cushing’s Manchester City side had enjoyed the luxury of picking from the cream of the England crop since their relaunch in 2013 joining the WSL. That continued here, with eight of the starting XI English. Goalkeeper Ellie Roebuck started at Sheffield United before joining City’s Development Squad as a seventeen-year-old in 2016. She made seventeen appearances last season and progressed through the ranks for the national team, making three senior England starts under Phil Neville. Steph Houghton has been the lynchpin of success, wearing the armband for both club and country and awarded an MBE in 2016. She rose to prominence during the 2012 London Olympics, scoring three crucial goals in four games for Team GB, including the decider in the match against Brazil at Wembley. Hailing from the North East she worked up the ranks at Sunderland, moved to Leeds and enjoyed three successful seasons at Arsenal in the WSL before moving to City in 2014. She’s won three WSL titles and ten Cups. Houghton has over a century of caps for England, being made captain by Mark Sampson in 2014. For a central defender, she’s scored an impressive thirteen international goals including one at each of the past two World Cups and lifted the SheBelieves Cup earlier this year. Fellow North Easterner Jill Scott has an incredible 146 England caps to her name and also played for Team GB during London 2012. Scottish midfielder Caroline Weir scored the only goal of the game in the first-ever WSL Manchester derby in September. Lauren Hemp signed a new contract earlier in the week and broke through to the England side in October for her debut cap. Up front, Ellen White shared the Golden Boot at this year’s World Cup with six goals, along with eventual winners USA’s Alex Morgan and Megan Rapinoe. White’s partner Georgia Stanway has become a key part of club and country, winning the 2019 PFA Women’s Young Player of the Year and scoring on her England debut a year ago. England left-back Demi Stokes, German forward Pauline Bremer and South Korean Lee Geum-min were amongst the substitutes. Refereeing this clash was Lucy Oliver.

MCW Kick Off MCW Comms MCW Somers

Presentation Team: Commentary was led by Vicki Sparks. A regular voice on the Women’s game, she also reported for BBC results service Final Score and magazine programme Football Focus. She became the first female commentator to voice a men’s World Cup match Live in 2018 when she was alongside Martin Keown for Portugal versus Morocco in the group stage. Alongside her today in the commentary box was Faye White. Born locally, in Horsham, White’s youth career was spent with Horsham Ladies, playing in the first team at the age of just fourteen. By sixteen she was called up to the national team before a career-making move to Arsenal Ladies, where she spent the rest of her career in the heart of the Gunners defence and captaining the side to glory. In seventeen years at Arsenal she made over three-hundred League appearances and lifted numerous trophies during the club’s most successful ever period. In just her second season in North London she was named the FA Women’s Player’s Player of the Year. In the same season she won the FA Cup and FA Women’s Premier League Cup to add to the Premier League National Division title from her first campaign. She would win the latter a further nine times, and all but one League title between 2000 and 2010, dominating the domestic scene before the WSL was introduced in 2010. She also lifted the inaugural Super League title in 2011. Four Community Shields, an additional eight FA Cups and five Premier League Cups were added to the collection. The trophy cabinet was completed in 2007 with the UEFA Women’s Cup, the first – and to date only – English women’s side to win the European prize. She made her England senior international debut aged nineteen in 1997 against Scotland and made a total of ninety appearances for the Lionesses, scoring twelve goals and captained them for a decade including at four major tournaments; UEFA Euros 2005 and 2009 and FIFA World Cups in 2007 and 2011. Current Albion boss Hope Powell gave White the England armband in 2002. She became a familiar presence on-screen too, in the studio for British Eurosport’s knockout stage coverage of Euro 2005 held in England, as well as at major women’s international tournaments for the BBC and domestically for Sky Sports, ESPN and BT Sport both during and after her playing career. Due to a number of serious injuries, White retired from international football in 2012 and professionally the following March. She was awarded an MBE in 2006 for her work on and off the pitch, Faye White is one of England’s all-time great women’s footballers. Completing the broadcast line-up on the touchline was Kelly Somers. Since joining the BBC in 2017 she has gone on to become a key part of the women’s coverage as well as reporting for Final Score and Football Focus. She is one of the regular presenters on The Women’s Football Show, along with Reshmin Chowdhury and Eilidh Barbour, and travelled to France to report on the Women’s World Cup 2019 in the summer. She came from a stadium presenting background, on the PA for the likes of West Ham and Surrey Storm and covered the 2018 men’s World Cup for Australian television.

MCW Brighton Arriving MCW Powell MCW Half Time Analysis MCW Coming Up

The Coverage: As always on the Red Button, Live coverage began ten minutes before the scheduled kick-off time; in this case 12.20pm. Proceedings were handled out-of-vision by the commentary team of Vicki Sparks and Faye White. With two WSL matches falling foul of the weather this weekend, there were only four League games taking place; two at 12.30pm and two at 2pm. Our trip to Manchester was the only televised game, whilst all the others were available Live on the FA Player app and website. This was introduced at the start of the campaign, allowing fans to watch any WSL match they wish to, Live and free, that isn’t already being televised. Because all matches were now being filmed with multiple cameras, replays and commentary, the BBC’s magazine programme The Women’s Football Show could show a comprehensive round-up of the weekend’s action and in an earlier 7pm slot, as well as the late night repeat after Match of the Day 2. Coverage began by looking at the surviving matches on a cold, winter’s Sunday. Leaders Arsenal and their visit to Everton being the other standout fixture. A glance at the current standings followed, where an unlikely win for the Albion would see them overtake Birmingham to go ninth with nine points. City needed the win to keep the chase on Arsenal, who held a three point advantage at the summit. The commentary team talked through shots of the two squads arriving at the Academy Stadium, adjacent to the Etihad Stadium on the campus. The other member of today’s BBC team, reporter Kelly Somers, spoke with both managers to preview the clash. City boss Nick Cushing was looking for an immediate response to their defeat against Chelsea last time out, saying it was “imperative” that they win today. “I’ve always said since I’ve been the coach here, that losing a game is disappointing but you have to make sure you win the next game after you lose.” Seagulls manager Hope Powell knew her side were in for another tough afternoon. She spoke positively of the overall achievements throughout the calendar year; “We’re in a better position this time compared to last season, so I’ve got to be pleased with that. Performances have been a little bit inconsistent; we’ve got to find that consistency going into the New Year, but generally I’m relatively happy.” Manchester City midfielder Lauren Hemp was picked out as the ‘One to Watch’ by the graphics as she warmed up. And before you knew it, it was time for the teams to emerge from the tunnel and the commentators to run through the line-ups before the big kick off.

MCW Getting to Know MCW Demi Stokes MCW Everton Arsenal MCW Player of the Match

The half time whistle blew after a very comfortable forty-five minutes for the home side. The break is when the BBC roll out a few features and VTs, with these fifteen minutes being longer than the pre-match and post-match coverage they have to fill the time. The commentators reviewed the three goals from the first period. The opener from Houghton was very tricky to save when hit with that much power from such close range. Co-commentator Faye White was impressed by the finish for the second goal; “There’s still a lot for her to do for Ellen White to get that on target, especially when it’s coming in at that pace.” Whilst the third was down to Steph Houghton’s movement and good knock down from the corner, finding Hemp for an easy nod home. They also took a look back at some of the other chances for Manchester City, who could have extended their lead on a number of occasions. The first VT of the interval featured City substitute Demi Stokes in the ‘Getting to Know’ feature. Twin sisters Rosie and Mollie Kmita interviewed the left-back whilst driving around on the golf buggy. The twins played together at Brighton when they were teenagers around 2013/14 and were most recently at West Ham. When the club went professional to join the WSL for last season they faced a choice. Rosie signed her first pro contract there and moved to London Bees for this campaign, whilst Mollie decided to go down her own route and manager a nationwide coaching academy. The pair presented radio shows for BBC 5 Live during the Women’s World Cup and were regulars during the half-time break as they interviewed stars from each WSL club to try to get an insight into the new breed of women’s footballer. Following on from that we saw first half highlights from the other 12.30pm kick-off as Everton hosted Arsenal. Commentary for the FA Player, and on this edit, was provided by Matt Davies-Adams. Goalscoring machine Vivianne Miedema’s strike separated them in the first half but the injury to Beth Mead being stretchered off was the concern for Faye White after the highlights edit. After reviewing the key moments from that half, it was time to switch focus back to the Academy Stadium for the second half of Manchester City versus Brighton. No involvement from the reporter with a special guest pundit on this occasion. After the full-time whistle, the broadcast remained on-air for around five minutes in order to wrap things up from the gantry. We got to hear from the Barclays Player of the Match, Lauren Hemp, speaking with Kelly Somers pitchside. And there we had it, Brighton’s heaviest televised defeat came at the hands of the FA Cup holders as the WSL signed off for 2019 and our commentators said their goodbyes to us for another day.

MCW Teams Emerge MCW Everyone on the goalline MCW Celebration MCW Hemp goal

Story of the Match: Brighton wore their change kit of all black against the blue of Manchester City’s shirts and white of their shorts and socks. The home team kicked off, shooting from left to right. Albion’s game plan should have been clear enough; as commentator Vicki Sparks pointed out after one minute, “It will be a tough test for Brighton. So important that they keep it tight early doors.” Ten seconds later, winger Janine Beckie struck a shot from the edge of the area to sting the palms of Brighton ‘keeper Sophie Harris. She palmed it away and it hit Matilde Lundorf to go comfortably back to the stopper and the danger passed. However, referee Lucy Oliver thought otherwise and gave an indirect free-kick some eight or so yards out for what she deemed a deliberate backpass. It was a dreadful decision from the official, there was no way that could ever be deemed an intentional pass when it just hit her leg, with no City players appealing for it and the commentator even assuming it was an offside, such was the banality of the decision. A shocker early on but a golden chance for Manchester City. Up stepped Steph Houghton, captain fantastic, who actually scored from a very similar position for England in the World Cup. That time she converted low to the bottom-right of the goal as she saw it. This time she went for power, driving it straight down the middle and under the dive of Harris and the leap of the covering defenders on the line. Manchester City were gifted a goal from the referee after just two minutes, it was going to be a very long afternoon for the Seagulls. Just before the quarter-hour mark, another goal arrived. Houghton played a nice ball wide to the right where Beckie was in space. She took one touch to control and the next to cross a fantastic ball into the middle, between defence and goalkeeper. Waiting to pounce for her opportunity was England’s summer goalscoring hero Ellen White, who executed an excellent volley into the top corner from close range. Two-nil and not much Harris could have done about that strike, the technique was terrific. Cue White’s now-familiar ‘goggles’ celebration, nicked from her favourite Bundesliga team Cologne and their striker Anthony Modeste. It was a half dominated by the blues and they added further misery to Brighton with eight minutes to go before the interval. Georgia Stanway’s corner was looped to the back post. Houghton won the header to send it back across and waiting to pounce three yards away was Lauren Hemp. She celebrated a contract extension in the week and signed it with a goal, heading home over the efforts of defender Fliss Gibbons to make it three-nil. Hemp couldn’t have asked for an easier finish. Further chances fell City’s way without adding to the scoresheet in the first period, and the half-time whistle was a relief for the Albion and a chance to regroup.

MCW Disallowed Albion goal MCW Harris save MCW Stanway goal MCW Five nil  

The second half began more brightly and more evenly. A few narrow misses from City at one end were followed by the ball in the back of the net up the other, as Ini Umotong thought she had pulled one back for Brighton. Aileen Whelan’s cross on the left was floated to that near post. City ‘keeper Ellie Roebuck hadn’t had much to do in the opening hour but had to be alert here. As she jumped to claim the cross, Umotong was up with her and the ball bounced down and over the line. As Albion players wheeled away, thinking they’d scored their first WSL goal away from home this campaign, the referee’s whistle was again to hamper them. There was a moment of confusion, as both the graphics department, the commentator and Roebuck herself believed the goal had been given. But Lucy Oliver slowly marched towards where the incident took place and awarded Manchester City the free kick for a foul. She signalled a push but replays showed that not to be the case. It was a harsh decision, the goalkeeper over-protected, as the challenge from Umotong seemed to be a fair one. Applying pressure on Roebuck, as did her own defender Gemma Bonner, the England goalie appeared to fumble and allow the ball to slip through her hands and tipped it in as it bounced down. Nevertheless, the Seagulls were denied and they remained three down. The half continued to be an open one, with Brighton looking much livelier and better organised. But the home side always looked more likely to add to their tally, posing so many dangerous threats with their wealth of talent across the field. This was emphasised with a move beginning from Roebuck and ending all the way up the other end with a one-on-one for Caroline Weir. An excellent through ball from Keira Walsh took four Albion defenders out of the game and set Weir through. Sophie Harris flew off her line to close the angle down, Weir’s shot saved by the ‘keeper and looped up and over for a corner. However, a fourth was added with eleven minutes remaining when another excellent through ball cut Brighton clean apart. This was another move starting at the back with City playing it around before Walsh, in her own half, decided to go long. Her pass through the gaps was outstanding to find Georgia Stanway in on goal. She used the pace on the ball to guide it past the outrushing Harris and give herself an empty net to tap into. It was another well-worked, clinical Manchester City goal. A fifth goal really put the icing on the cake to cap off a fantastic home display. Late substitute Pauline Bremer became the fifth different scorer when her thigh improvised to flick in from a cross with less than four minutes to play. Beckie provided the assist from the right and Bremer’s touch just looped up over Harris into the other corner of the net. Lea Le Garrec worked an opportunity on the edge of the area with the final shot of the match hoping to bring Brighton a consolation, but Roebuck watched it all the way to dive and gather. So that’s where the scoring ended, a five-star performance from Manchester City to keep them in the title race amongst the chasing pack. Brighton remained towards the foot of the table ahead of the Christmas break. The next WSL fixture for the Seagulls saw bottom club Liverpool come to Crawley. That was a much more important match in the bid to remain in this League for another season.

MCW Final Score

MANCHESTER CITY WOMEN 5 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0
Houghton, White, Hemp, Stanway, Bremer

MCW Replay

PREVIOUS; #5 ARSENAL WOMEN 4-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN 29/09/2019

NEXT; #7 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0-4 ARSENAL WOMEN 12/01/2020

 

 

#5: Arsenal Women 4-0 Brighton Women 29/09/2019

#5 ARSENAL WOMEN 4-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN Women’s Super League
Sunday 29th September 2019 LIVE via Red Button

5ARS Intro

COMMENTATOR Robyn Cowen CO-COMMENTATOR Jayne Ludlow
REPORTER Kelly Somers HALF TIME Danielle Carter
12.30pm Kick Off; Meadow Park, Borehamwood     12.20-2.30pm Live on BBC Red Button

5ARS Fixtures 5ARS Table pre match 5ARS Home team arrival 5ARS Brighton arrivals

Context of the Match: The Seagulls survived their first season as a full-time professional top flight club, finishing the 2018/2019 Women’s Super League campaign in ninth spot out of the eleven clubs. Hope Powell’s side won four and drew four of their twenty League matches to give a final points tally of sixteen. Yeovil dropped down to the FA Women’s Championship, with two new teams – Manchester United and Tottenham – coming up to form a twelve club top level. Brighton’s aim was to maintain their WSL status for another year. With the increased competition from the strong promoted teams, as well as a huge gulf between the likes of Arsenal, Chelsea and Manchester City at the top, this would be another difficult season. The spotlight was on the Women’s game in this country following an incredibly popular World Cup in France during the summer. England’s Lionesses reached their second successive World Semi Final, losing to eventual Champions USA, and viewing figures went through the roof. The record audience was smashed four times during the tournament; culminating in a peak of 11.7 million on primetime BBC One, almost three times the record in this country pre-World Cup. It was important for the game to ride the crest of this wave to expand and improve further. Brighton reported a huge increase in season ticket sales, at a cost of just £30, hoping to attract record attendances through the Crawley turnstiles once more this campaign. On the broadcasting front, the television rights deal remained as it was last year with a Live match from each round of the WSL being broadcast on BBC via the Red Button and a further game on BT Sport. In addition, the Football Association launched their own app – the FA Player – which allowed anyone anywhere to watch every single WSL match Live and for free. It was a huge initiative and meant that, for some players, it would be the first time many of their friends and family would be able to watch their League performances in full. The BBC’s summer of Women’s sport was tag lined “Change the game”; this attempted to do just that. And financial support was provided by Barclays Bank, who became the first title sponsor of the League, now known as the FA Barclays WSL. For Brighton’s first Live televised match of the campaign, a tough trip to Champions Arsenal awaited. This was just the third match of the League season and both clubs went into it unbeaten. The Gunners defeated West Ham and Manchester United to have a 100% start, whilst the Albion drew the opener at Bristol City nil-nil and were just seconds away from beating Champions League Semi Finalists Chelsea, but for an injury time equaliser. If they could come away with something from Borehamwood here, it would be the biggest result in the Division so far, and in front of the BBC cameras.

5ARS Arsenal5ARS Brighton

The Teams: Hope Powell strengthened her Albion squad over the summer break, adding a couple of new faces to bolster the core that survived their first season as a fully professional top flight team. Goalkeeper Megan Walsh made the switch from relegated Yeovil, where she spent two years. Yeovil’s relegation followed a period of administration which hit the club dearly, forcing them to move down to the third tier after their application to join the second tier Championship was rejected; forcing a mass exodus of their star players. The twenty-four-year-old represented England at under-17, 19 and 23 level. Another new signing was young Danish full-back Matilde Lundorf. She transferred from Aarhus and previously was part of Paris Saint Germain’s youth setup. Lundorf slotted in to an established back four including Fliss Gibbons and Victoria Williams. The latter saw her penalty saved in the opening day goalless draw at Bristol City. Completing the defence was Fern Whelan, with the Seagulls missing Laura Rafferty long term due to an ACL injury picked up in training. In front of the defence sat Dani Bowman, the midfielder better known as Dani Buet. She got married in the summer, hence the name change. On the left wing, Aileen Whelan’s goal in the previous League match at home to Chelsea almost caused a huge upset before the Blues scrambled home a stoppage time equaliser. Ellie Brazil featured heavily in the previous WSL campaign, whilst Emily Simpkins was more of a fringe player. This was her first start of the League season, coming in to replace French international Lea Le Garrec; a close season recruit from Guingamp. Irishwoman Megan Connolly could play either in the middle or up top. Completing the starting XI was Welsh international Kayleigh Green. Among the options on the bench were striker Ini Umotong, who opened the scoring in this fixture last season, and defender Danique Kerkdijk. She was part of the Netherlands World Cup squad that finished as runners up in France in the summer, having signed for Brighton prior to the tournament. For Joe Montemurro’s Champion Arsenal side, six of the starting line-up were in their nation’s World Cup squads over the summer. That included the deadly Dutch duo up top of Vivianne Miedema and Danielle Van de Donk. Miedema broke the WSL record for most goals in a single season last campaign, netting a total of twenty-two in twenty League matches. She also became the Netherlands all-time top scorer in June, scoring for the sixtieth time in international competition at the age of just twenty-three. Scottish duo Kim Little and Lisa Evans provide further goals and creativity in a star-studded line up. That meant no room for England’s Beth Mead, who started as a substitute today, whilst her fellow Lioness Leah Williamson held firm in the middle of the park. The big absentee from England’s Semi Final squad was Jordan Nobbs but back in the domestic side this season after recovering from the injury which kept her out of the entire first half of 2019. French reserve ‘keeper Pauline Peyraud-Magnin kept goal for the Gunners, as they waved goodbye to Dutch stopper, and goalie of the World Cup, Sari van Veenendaal after four years. Refereeing today’s contest at Boreham Wood Football Club was Elliot Swallow.

5ARS Kick Off 5ARS Comms 5ARS Presentation team

Presentation Team: Commentary was provided by Robyn Cowen and Jayne Ludlow. Cowen is one of the leading voices of women’s football in this country. She commentated on the Women’s World Cup for the BBC in France, behind Jonathan Pearce as the number two. Two years earlier, Cowen was second choice behind Steve Bower for Channel 4’s coverage of the Women’s European Championships in the Netherlands. Since 2018, along with Vicki Sparks, Cowen is one of the BBC’s regular voices on Live WSL matches and has commentated on the men’s game for Match of the Day. As of the beginning of the 2019/20 campaign, she featured more heavily on the Premier League highlights and has been a reporter for Final Score and Football Focus for four years. This is the second time commentating on an Albion Women’s match Live, having been behind the mic for the defeat to Chelsea in December 2018. Co-commentator Jayne Ludlow is the Welsh Women’s national team manager, having been in the post since 2014. The forty-year-old retired from playing in 2013 and has a year in charge of Reading before her country came calling. The former midfielder spent thirteen years at Arsenal, of which she is a supporter, and captained the side to numerous League and Cup successes. Since the BBC regularly broadcasted Live WSL matches from the start of last season, Ludlow has become an increasingly frequent member of the team. She is a pundit on magazine programme The Women’s Football Show and rotates turns in the commentary box along with Sue Smith and Laura Bassett. As with the other BBC Red Button games, the programme is handled out-of-vision by the commentary team apart from a brief couple of minutes during half time. During this period, the presenter and guest for the evening’s Women’s Football Show provide a report on the match so far. That role fell today to Kelly Somers, who doubled up as the pitchside reporter, and guest Danielle Carter. Somers previous work included matchday stadium hosting at AFC Bournemouth and cricket side Surrey Storm before climbing the ranks at the BBC. She continues to do stadium presenting for West Ham but is better known as a reporter and presenter for The Women’s Football Show on the BBC for the past two years, sharing duties with Eilidh Barbour and Reshmin Chowdhury. Somers also reported on other BBC magazine programmes Football Focus and Final Score and on radio for Talksport. Outside of the UK, she can be seen by the world on the Premier League Productions preview and Fantasy Football fan shows. Her guest Danielle Carter is a current Arsenal Women’s striker out injured with a knee problem suffered in pre-season. She’s spent her entire senior career to date at the Gunners, playing over a century of matches in ten years graduating from the Leyton Orient youth setup to the Arsenal first team. She has also represented England at every level from under-17, under-19, under-20 and under-23s as well as the senior side, netting a hat-trick on debut in an eight-nil victory in Estonia.

5ARS Powell 5ARS One to Watch 5ARS Coming Up

The Coverage: From the beginning of this season, a brand new initiative was launched by the Football Association which transformed the coverage of the women’s game in this country. The “FA Player” app made every single Super League match available Live and for free, wherever you were in the world. This was in addition to the television broadcast deal in place from last year, where Live League games were shown on BT Sport and the BBC Red Button. The FA Player meant that all other non-televised matches were available to stream Live on the app. On the back of the success of the England team reaching the Semi Final of the Women’s World Cup, and the huge audiences achieved on the BBC, the FA attempted to capitalise on the growing interest. Matches were being played in men’s first team club stadiums such as Stamford Bridge and The Etihad, with record attendance figures being smashed in the opening days of the season. The national side would be playing at Wembley in November setting a new record for ticket sales as over 80,000 people were expected. In terms of the television coverage, BT Sport continued to broadcast at least one game per matchweek. The BBC provided their magazine programme The Women’s Football Show with a new primetime Sunday 7pm slot on BBC Four and a repeat on BBC One after Match of the Day 2. Like before, one WSL match per round was moved to an earlier kick off slot for Live broadcast on the BBC website and Red Button. Coverage began ten minutes before the 12.30pm start and was introduced by the commentary team of Robyn Cowen and Jayne Ludlow. The programme began with a glance at the day’s other WSL fixtures and the current table standings before previewing our clash with Champions Arsenal. We saw shots of the two teams arriving at the ground and getting off the coach, across a rainy Meadow Park stadium, before hearing from both managers who were interviewed by Kelly Somers. Arsenal’s Joe Montemurro called it “probably the toughest game of September”, aware of Albion’s impressive draw with Chelsea last time out. Brighton boss Hope Powell was in good spirits reflecting on the first matches of the campaign; “Really pleased we’ve started well, it’s a 100% improvement on last year which is great. Today we’re under no illusions on how challenging the test will be but we’re in fighting spirit, we’re gonna give it a good go.”  She went on to stress the importance of the defence standing strong and being diligent in order to get something out of this match. Jayne Ludlow picked out Leah Williamson as the ‘One to Watch’ for Arsenal, equally adept at playing in defence or midfield. Whilst the Albion’s Dani Bowman was her choice from our squad, highlighting the midfielder’s tough tackling and links to her time at Arsenal early on in her career. After a little more chat, the teams were ready and waiting to emerge from the tunnel.

5ARS Half Time 1 5ARS Half Time 2 5ARS POTM

New for this season was the replay transition wipe sporting a BBC logo instead of the WSL crest. During the half time break, fifteen minutes of air time had to be filled and this was where the BBC’s Red Button coverage would include a couple of features and interviews. The commentary team began by analysing the best of the first half action, including the two Arsenal goals separating the teams. The pass for Kim Little’s opener and the finish from Vivianne Miedema to double the lead were particularly good. They showed how tough it was for Kayleigh Green up front on her own for the Albion, having to do a lot with little possession and support. Our first VT of half time was an interview with Manchester United Women’s captain Katie Zelem in a feature called ‘This is Me’. She spoke about how she got into the game, her earliest memories of football and her influences. She’s the skipper and big United fan but used to play for Liverpool, and the two sides met in the WSL the day before. Extended highlights of that clash were shown next, with commentary from Michael McCann. With every match streamed Live on the FA Player, it meant each one had a commentator, which would then be used during the highlights show. Goals from Lauren James and Katie Zelem secured a two-nil victory at their Leigh Sports home, their first League win of the season. Then it was time to head down to the touchline to join Kelly Somers and Danielle Carter to review the first half, who were in situ ahead of recording that evening’s Women’s Football Show links. Carter said it was as expected from Brighton, sitting in deep and trying to defend for their lives making it trickier for Arsenal to break them down. She cited the difference in the quality of players being the difference, whilst the first half stats scrawled on the bottom right hand corner of the screen confirming the home side’s dominance. Arsenal enjoyed two-thirds of the possession, had six shots to Albion’s one and both on target resulted in goals. The pair also chatted about the League in general, England Women and the other matches that weekend. They ended by updating us on the progress of Carter’s knee injury, at the very early stages of her rehab and expecting to be out for quite a while yet. With that, it was time for the second half to begin. When the match concluded, there was just three or four minutes left to wrap things up before coming off air. Barclays Player of the Match Jordan Nobbs was interviewed on pitch by Kelly Somers, as the rain continued to lash down on them. The midfielder was delighted to back playing again after a long time out, this her first home game of 2019. She summarised by saying “I think we controlled the ball very well and kept possession but we’ve seen Brighton get points and play very well against Chelsea. So I think we’ve got the three points we wanted and Joe [Montemurro] will be happy with the way we played today.” After a quick look ahead to programmes to come on the BBC, it was time to say goodbye and bring an end to another Live Seagulls broadcast.

5ARS Lining up 5ARS Little opener

Story of the Match: The Gunners got the game underway kicking from right to left in the first half. The BBC scorebar initially struggled to cope with Albion’s change kit, wearing green instead of blue, and so disappeared from screen intermittently whilst they updated the colours. On the field, Arsenal dominated the ball and it did not take long for them to break the deadlock. In just the ninth minute, Vivianne Miedema slipped the ball through the back line for Kim Little to latch on to. The Scot took one touch to set herself before slotting low past Megan Walsh from six yards. The Albion had to dig deep for much of the rest of the half, with left back Fliss Gibbons in particular earned her pay cheque and preserved the scoreline. The Seagulls were restricted to very little by way of attacking threat. Kayleigh Green’s speculative right-footed effort from twenty-five yards was about as good as it got. The shot not a problem for Payroud-Magnin ten minutes before the break. Five minutes later, Arsenal doubled their lead through some nice, neat passing. A short corner found Little on the left. She looked for Jordan Nobbs whose lovely first-time cushioned pass sat nicely for Miedema in the area. She got her shot off early, a hard drive on the left of the six-yard box which flew into the opposite corner of the net. It was a very well worked move from the Champions and they deservedly went in two-nil up at the whistle. Hope Powell brought back Lea Le Garrec to bolster the attack for the second half, replacing Emily Simpkins. The Frenchwoman immediately showed positive intentions with a long-range shot, even if the execution left a lot to be desired.

5ARS Sub 5ARS Nobbs four

However, it took just eleven minutes for a third goal to go in, this time from Danielle Van de Donk. Brighton’s Megan Connolly was dispossessed twenty yards inside her own half by Maier. In an attempt to win it back, Connolly’s challenge deflected the ball into the path of Miedema who rolled the pressure of Victoria Williams. Miedema then laid the ball on for her fellow Dutch international Van de Donk, who took one touch and finished like a natural goalscorer. Deadly from Arsenal and it was game over for sure now, if it wasn’t already. The task for the Seagulls was now to keep the score respectable. Maya Le Tissier replaced Kayleigh Green for fresh legs in the midfield. A four-goal margin was about par against these top sides last season. And four-nil it was when Jordan Nobbs added her name to the scoresheet with twenty minutes to play. Substitute Beth Mead was set free down the right of the penalty area from Little’s pass. Her cross went over everyone and to the other side of the box. The cut back was headed out to the edge of the box for Nobbs to hit it on the half-volley. Her shot squirmed through the crowd of players to deceive Megan Walsh as it went between her legs and in for four. A chance to pull one back fell the way of right-back Matilde Lundorf ten minutes from time, but she scuffed her effort wide of the target after latching onto a loose ball in the area. Back at the busier end, Beth Mead saw her effort on the edge crash against the angle of post and bar after a one-two with Nobbs. It remained four-nil to the Arsenal as the final whistle brought to an end a miserable, tough afternoon for Brighton. It was clear the Albion were still a long way off those top clubs in the Women’s Super League. Onwards and upwards from now on.

5ARS Full Time

ARSENAL WOMEN 4 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0
Little, Miedema, Van de Donk, Nobbs

5ARS Replay

PREVIOUS; #4 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0-4 ARSENAL WOMEN 28/04/2019

NEXT; #6 MANCHESTER CITY WOMEN 5-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN 15/12/2019

 

 

Small Screen Seagulls; The Rise and Fall of Gus Poyet

Small Screen Seagulls LogoGustavo Augusto Poyet Dominguez, or Gus Poyet to you and me, made a name for himself as a talented midfielder for Zaragoza, Chelsea and Tottenham. The Uruguayan spent seven years in the Premier League picking up the FA Cup, Charity Shield, UEFA Super Cup and Cup Winners’ Cup. At international level, although he didn’t earn too many caps, he did lift the Copa America in 1995. Affectionately nicknamed “the radio” due to his incessant talking, there was no doubting he would go into coaching. Not many would have earmarked League One Brighton and Hove Albion as the club to give him his first managerial break. In November 2009 that’s exactly what happened, as Poyet brought a South American touch to the South Coast. 


Gus Poyet Brighton Manager 10th Nov 2009-23rd Jun 2013

Poyet's first game interviews (1)Gus Poyet had been assistant manager at Tottenham, Leeds and Swindon but now was given the top job for the first time. It was undoubtedly a gamble from new chairman Tony Bloom, but he was no stranger to playing the odds. Having taken over from Dick Knight in May, Bloom arrived as Brighton had just saved their skin on the final day with victory over Stockport at Withdean meaning they would remain in League One for another season. But the following campaign saw more misery at the start and Russell Slade’s short tenure was over. After Slade’s dismissal, Bloom said he received lots of applicants for the vacancy but when Poyet’s name was thrown in, he became ‘very interested’ before adding, “His reputation as being a top quality coach shone through, as well as being a top man… I am certain he will be a big success at the Albion.” Poyet certainly agreed, stating in a BBC Sussex interview “This is another challenge for me to take the club where everybody in Brighton wants to be and that’s in the Championship… Being realistic I think eighteen months is possible. If that is the goal of the club, it’s no problem.” He signed an initial contract until the end of the following season, which would be Albion’s final one at their makeshift home of Withdean. There was an immediate interest in the club from the media and it just so happened that Poyet’s first match in charge would be televised Live five days after taking charge. As a well known player in the Premier League, he scored some fantastic goals and assisted many more. As assistant coach he worked alongside big names, the likes of Juande Ramos and Dennis Wise. He was well used to lots of attention, but Brighton were not. The main focus in the spotlight was usually about the club’s fight for a stadium, a battle which dragged on for over a decade. Now, with Gus at the helm, there was an increase in coverage purely to see how the Uruguayan would be getting on. It turned out to go rather well.

Poyet appointedClimbing the table and building his own style was the first aim for Poyet. Results started to arrive and the style of play was overhauled. It was about getting the ball on the floor, playing out from the back, enjoying possession and passing the ball as much as possible. It was his philosophy and he only wanted to play one way. The club finished thirteenth in League One in May 2010 and sights were set on the top six. Poyet’s free-flowing Brighton side went even better in the 2010/2011 season, Poyet’s first full campaign, as they stormed to the top of the table and ran away with the title at a canter, soaring to the top of the table in September and never letting up. The club played some of the best football the supporters had ever seen. It culminated with a whopping 95 points to be crowned Champions as they bid farewell to life at Withdean and welcomed in the new stadium in Falmer with Championship football after five years away. In the process, Poyet earned the PFA League One Manager of the Year award and went on to claim the Outstanding Managerial Achievement prize at the Football League Awards. Praise was flying in from everywhere and the momentum continued in the second tier. His Seagulls narrowly missed out on the Play Off places in the 2011/2012 season as they took naturally to the higher League. One big push the following year saw them finish fourth and reach that end of season showdown for the first time at this level since 1991. That time it was ended at Wembley by Notts County, but for Gus it was Crystal Palace who did for us in 2013. And everything immediately fell apart in the days and weeks that followed. It ended with a bitter public fallout in which Poyet lost his job and Brighton had to start again. Here, we take a look at some of the media appearances Gus Poyet made whilst in charge of Brighton. A natural in front of the camera, he interviewed with passion and honesty and was a favourite in the studio. It all began by taking his new side along the South Coast for a birthday to remember.

 

First Match in Charge; v Southampton (A), 15th November 2009

#28 Southampton 15/11/2009 Table on Poyet's arrival

Five days after signing on at Brighton, Gus Poyet took his new club along the Coast to Southampton for a big clash at the foot of the League One table. Sky Sports couldn’t believe their luck, having already chosen this match in advance for Live television coverage over the international break weekend. Having a high-profile new manager in charge, and on his birthday, was the icing on the cake. Brighton sat 20th and in need of a rethink having shipped four goals in the previous match at Wycombe. In contrast, Southampton were in great form yet propped up the table for most of the season so far due to a ten-point deduction owing to financial irregularities but a win would take them out of the drop zone and above Albion. Sky Sports reporter Greg Whelan spoke to Poyet before his debut in charge and began by asking how much he was looking forward to the challenge. “We’ve done everything possible, because it’s only three days normally you have normally have a month of pre-season but, like I always say, I don’t complain at the situation and we have to accept it.” He spoke of the “talent and quality” of the squad he inherited but emphasised the need to shore up the back line, which he immediately tried to address by dropping captain Adam Virgo from the starting XI. The match couldn’t have gone any better, a full report is available here, as Brighton surged to a terrific three-one away victory with goals from Andrew Crofts and a Glenn Murray brace. Afterwards, a slightly hoarse Poyet spoke again with Whelan. “The lads were superb. We had two or three days to train, they adapted themselves to the situation very well.” He was pleased with the effort from the defence and debated whether the Southampton goal from the penalty spot should have been given in the first place. His focus was now about taking it game by game whilst he worked out exactly what to do with this squad and where strength was needed. “We need to think about keep improving as a team, keep working hard, keep believing in the strength of the team and work hard on the weakness.” In the studio, host George Gavin and pundit Peter Beagrie predicted brighter things for the Albion. “It’s a big task for Gus but I think, because you’ve got somebody with such kudos attached to it, I think he’s gonna be given time to build something at Brighton,” Beagrie said. That time spent during the rest of the 2009/10 campaign was enough to lift the club up the table steadily and with an attractive, open style which was enough to secure thirteenth place the following May, well clear of the relegation zone this time. Times certainly were changing.

SOU Poyet SOU Studio


Football League Weekend studio appearance; Sky Sports 2, 21st October 2011

FLW Titles FLW Poyet

In Poyet’s first full season in charge, Brighton were unstoppable as they stormed their way to the League One title. He built an exciting, attacking team dominating possession with free-flowing, passing football. The 2010/2011 campaign would be remembered amongst the greatest in Albion’s history as they took on and defeated all comers. The championship was secured in the final season at Withdean with four games to spare and ensured the opening of The Amex in Falmer would be as a second tier club again. A massive ninety-five points were obtained along the way, with Poyet named LMA League One Manager of the Season earning him huge acclaim. He strengthened over the summer to twice break the club’s transfer record – first on Will Buckley and then Craig Mackail-Smith – and began life in the Championship in superbly dramatic style with a last-gasp two-one opening day win over Doncaster. However, form over the next couple of months had stalled after positive opening weeks. Sky Sports had selected the home match against West Ham for Live television coverage on the Monday night. To preview that and the rest of the weekend’s fixtures, Gus Poyet was invited into the Football League Weekend studio to accompany George Gavin on the Friday evening. He admitted that he found the step up in League “very hard, very competitive” citing more power, strength, quality and experience in the Championship. After a dozen matches the Seagulls sat in tenth place on nineteen points going into this weekend. Poyet’s achievements so far earned him a contract extension beyond the original eighteen months and boasted a terrific win ratio of more than 50% over a century of matches. The stats were looking fantastic.

FLW Studio FLW Record

Gavin and Poyet discussed the move from Withdean to The Amex and how that impacted the club. Gus made his feelings clear about the old athletics ground; “I know people love it but I don’t. I’m the only one at Brighton who said that it was one of the horrible places to play football!” Of course by contrast he loved life in Falmer; “It’s totally the opposite – it’s massive, it’s comfortable, even the seats now!” He made a number of improvements on the playing staff too, bringing in the likes of Mackail-Smith, Buckley and Vicente as well as younger talents like Will Hoskins and Romain Vincelot. Poyet singled out Scotland’s newest striker Mackail-Smith for his outstanding workrate; “He’s the type of player that, when you are a defender, you don’t want against you. He’s quicker than what people think, he’s always running, desperate to play”. The Tuesday before the show, Brighton drew one-all away at Millwall which featured one of the weakest penalties in club history from Ryan Harley. Poyet’s response; “I was not a penalty taker so I’m not gonna blame anyone who takes penalties.” Without a win in six, form had gone off the boil having not lost in the opening six matches. A tough period was ahead for Poyet as clashes with West Ham and Southampton were coming up but Poyet was in buoyant mood. “I look at that as a manager, as a player, the fixtures – where is West Ham? There. Where is Birmingham? There. That’s the games you want to play… I love it.” Poyet talked through his own methods of coaching. On his preparation, he said “I’ve done everything possible to win this football game… I’ve done my job, then it’s up to the players” He didn’t join in playing during training whereas assistant Mauricio Taricco did. And the programme drew to a close with a quick mention of the success in League One; “I think it’s incredible what we did last year… The way we played we surprised people early doors and got points ahead and it was difficult for them to get back.” His aim of a top ten finish was in sight. “We’ll see.”

FLW Signings FLW Fixtures


Football League Weekend interview; Sky Sports 1, 2nd March 2012

FLWI Forster Poyet's Office

After a bit of a blip, Brighton were firmly back on course in the Championship. By March the club were on the fringes of the Play Offs in their first season back. Sky Sports preview programme Football League Weekend sent their reporter and former Albion striker Nicky Forster to the manager’s office to catch up with the boss. This was a particularly enlightening interview, given what we know subsequently. It began by discussing the situation at the time; Brighton were in seventh place level on points with the final Play Off team and thirteen matches remaining. Poyet admitted that placing was “just a little bit better than expected” as he was “expecting to be in the middle really”. He continued to play things down, saying “I don’t think we should be real contenders but I think we’ve got a chance because we are a little bit different.” To give a real insight into the mind of Poyet, Forster questioned him on the inevitable links to bigger clubs that come when a manager does as well as Gus had done thus far. “It’s good because that means we’re doing something right. I try to wait for the time it happens, I try to live with it. Sometimes it’s a shock and it’s crazy for a few days but I’m lucky.” The attention feeds into a crucial part of the man; his ego. The success in League One earned Poyet a new long-term contract but, he said, “at the same time, like any other job, there is a time frame that you need to set up… depending on how we do, you can stay forever or not.” He then spoke of some of the positives of the future, with the academy on the horizon and a plan in mind but didn’t want to commit to too much detail for fear of everything changing and then “looking stupid”. Perhaps this attention from other clubs and talk about promotion was a bit much as things quickly began to go off the boil. After this interview, Brighton won just two of the thirteen matches to drop down to tenth. Was their eye taken off the ball and heads were allowed to turn, we’ll never probably know. But what was known amongst the footballing community was how good a job Poyet was doing. The studio team of host George Gavin with Simon Grayson and Phil Brown echoed that afterwards, demonstrating it with the excellent results since the New Year.

FLWI 2012 Results FLWI Presentation team


Football League Award Winner; BBC One South East, 12th March 2012

LKO Titles LKO Award

Gus Poyet’s great work at the Albion was recognised by the Football League at their annual awards dinner in March 2012. He was honoured with the Outstanding Managerial Performance across the three Divisions for transforming the Seagulls from relegation candidates to League One Champions within eighteen months of taking charge. BBC regional magazine show Late Kick Off reported on the event the following evening. The Brighton area was now served by the “London and South East” BBC region, meaning a new line up for the 2012 series of Late Kick Off, with Football Focus presenter Dan Walker at the helm as the Albion shared the spotlight with the clubs from the capital. Walker was joined in the studio by former Charlton and Wimbledon striker Jason Euell and ex-Crystal Palace front man Mark Bright. Poyet said of his award; “I’ve been lucky to be at the right club at the right time… The key is the players. If you make sure you get the right players, you convince them, you make sure they want to play for the football club and they believe in what we do… you got a chance.” By the time the gong was handed out to him, Brighton were sat fifth in the Championship table with ten matches of the season to go, such was the lateness of this award we had almost completed the following season. In fact, Poyet was doing such a great job to carry on the momentum of promotion into the higher tier and in the new stadium, he wouldn’t have looked out of place on the shortlist for the award for this 2011/2012 campaign either. In the studio, Mark Bright was full of praise for the job done by the former Chelsea midfielder. “The move into the new stadium was fantastic for the Brighton fans and for the team. But the style of football they play, they’re now looking at back to back promotions – and seriously as well – I think they are big contenders. There was a lot of respect in the room for Gus Poyet.” The final few matches of the season saw the Albion tail off and miss out on the Play Offs but over the course of Poyet’s first two seasons in charge he won plenty of plaudits for the open, attractive passing style of play and were candidates to go one step further into the top six the following season.

LKO Poyet LKO Studio


Last Match in Charge; v Crystal Palace (H), 13th May 2013

PAL Titles PAL Poyet

The club missed out on the Play Offs in 2012 having dropped too many points in the final third of the season and winning just one of the last ten. Poyet signalled to the board that, in order to go one step further, investment was much needed. Tony Bloom answered by providing funds to bring in top class players such as Tomasz Kuszczak, Bruno, Wayne Bridge, Andrea Orlandi and David Lopez over the summer. The squad was sharp and solid. The Albion even led the Championship briefly in September. Too many draws cost us in November and December as Brighton slipped down the top half. Leonardo Ulloa and Matthew Upson were brought in to add even more quality in January and result picked up again for Poyet. Just one defeat in the first eleven matches of 2013 saw the club back in the Play Off pack and an unbeaten last nine games cemented fourth place in the second tier, the highest finish for thirty years since relegation from the old Division One. It set up a crunch clash with Crystal Palace in the Play Off Semi Finals and, after drawing the away leg nil-nil on the Friday, it was all down to this Monday night in May at The Amex. Brighton were favourites and dispatched of their rivals three-nil as recently as March here. Gus Poyet was one match away from a Wembley Final. It turned out to be a dreadful night. Palace won the game two-nil and went on to gain promotion with a Final win over Watford. An incident in the away dressing room prior to kick off enraged their boss Ian Holloway and fired up the Palace players.

After the televised match, Poyet spoke to Sky Sports reporter Jonathan Oakes in a conversation which fuelled speculation about the Uruguayan’s future with the Albion and saw him lose the support of the chairman and board. It began with Poyet’s summation of the campaign; “You have a very, very good season, better than expected. You done something very good and then because of this Play Off you go home with a terrible feeling and I’m really sad.” Over the course of the two Legs, Poyet thought Brighton should have edged it. He praised the First Leg performance in particular, dominating that first half but not getting the reward. But complained of his side’s poor showing in this match; “We were not ourself, too much tension, too much responsibility… That is not us.” The damning moments came at the end of the interview when asked about recovering from this and his future with the club. “I don’t want to make any decisions or any comments right now because the feelings are not the best so I will sit down, check properly everything… Where is the roof? Did we hit the roof today and there is nothing above? What is going to be the situation next year? But we’ve got time.” Asked if he would be here next season he replied, “I need to analyse my personal diary.” Emotions played a big part of Poyet’s success, being fiery and passionate and feeling all the highs and lows. But when it came to interviews, particularly just after a defeat or if something hadn’t gone his way, Poyet showed his managerial immaturity too many times. It wasn’t his place to question the ambitions of the club in the minutes after a heart-breaking defeat in this manner. Blame was being placed at everyone else’s door instead of his own. Brighton’s squad was better than Crystal Palace’s but he couldn’t get past them. And for that he should have faced up to it. It was silly to talk about ‘hitting the roof’ and touting himself as available for other jobs in such a manner. This was noted immediately by the board, who acted to suspend him from his job pending an internal inquiry in the subsequent days. Poyet was in danger of undoing all the great work he put in to this club and it was his own fault for the bitter ending.


TV Pundit Poyet dismissed by Brighton; BBC Three, 23rd June 2013

TV Studio TV Poyet

Never one to go quietly, the manner of Gus Poyet’s eventual dismissal from Brighton following a period of suspension caused headline news. Not necessarily for the sacking itself though, more for the way the news reached the public domain. On Sunday 23rd June 2013, Poyet was working as a pundit on BBC Three’s Live coverage of the FIFA Confederations Cup match between Nigeria and Spain. Sat in the warm Salford studio alongside fellow guest Efan Ekoku and host Mark Chapman, the news was delivered to the viewers at home during the half-time break that Gus Poyet’s contract with Brighton had been terminated with immediate effect. Chapman began the coverage by announcing, “We will look more at that first half during half-time, but we’re gonna start half-time by talking about Gus because it’s been a slightly odd first forty-five minutes for those of us in the studio and particularly for Gus because after three-and-a-half-years as Brighton manager, whilst we’ve been on-air this evening Gus has been told that his contract has been terminated.” The official statement, below, issued by the football club on the Seagulls website was read out. Poyet insisted that the first he heard of the decision was when a member of the BBC production staff printed out the statement and handed it to the studio team whilst the match they’re covering was in play. Brighton and Hove Albion refute these claims.

TV Statement

Poyet began by saying, “I think BBC have got a great story forever, really. Because a manager getting information that he’s been released from his employment by the BBC during the time of a programme is quite surprising.” He said he did not receive any form of communication from the club prior to this statement being released. He added a veiled barb towards the Albion hierarchy by saying, “I think everybody, the viewers and everyone, can take their own conclusion about the way that I’ve been informed.” He confirmed that he intended to appeal the decision and had already spoken with his lawyers around the next steps but was limited in what he could say right now. He was most sad with the fact that during the suspension period, lasting for over a month until this point, Poyet had not been allowed any form of communication with his players or staff for legal reasons. After the match, they returned to the subject of Poyet’s dismissal to delve a little further and reiterate the news to any latecomers. Chapman asked him if he was now on the job market again, to which he replied, whilst reaching for the piece of paper in front of him, “From what I read from the statement is that I am unemployed.” If he genuinely didn’t know about this before coming on-air then he handled it brilliantly. If he did know, it was a masterclass in hamming it up and feigning surprise. Given the nature of his fiery personality on the touchline, you tend to think that he would have been a bit more outspoken if this was genuine news to him. He did look rather emotional though as the questions wore on. Gus Poyet’s time in charge of the Albion concluded with the following message at the end of the programme; “First I would like to thank every single Brighton fan for being so patient with me, supportive. They’ve been outstanding. I know how difficult it was in the beginning to change a way of understanding football and they’ve been excellent with me all the time. They were patient, they believed, they got convinced and I’m sure they are proud of the football club and the team they’ve been watching over the last three-and-a-half-years.” Gus Poyet did not go through with his appeal and his tenure at Brighton came to a sad end after such highs.

TV Chapman TV Studio 2


The relationship between Brighton and Hove Albion, the supporters and Gus Poyet completely broke down after that terrible Play Off night in May 2013. Poyet was soon suspended by the club, along with coaches Mauricio Taricco and Charlie Oatway, pending an inquiry after comments made after the Crystal Palace match. The full truth probably will never emerge about exactly what happened behind the scenes there but it was all rather unsavoury. When he was dismissed from the club in June, Poyet insisted the first he heard of it was when he was making a punditry appearance Live on the BBC, who broke the news to him on-air. The club statement said Poyet was already aware of their decision. Whatever happened, it was a very sad ending to what had been a fantastic period for both Poyet and the Albion. He oversaw the move into the new stadium with a seamless transition from Champions of League One at Withdean to promotion candidates in the Championship at the new home of The Amex. He transformed the playing style of the club, moving away from long-ball plodders struggling at the foot of the third tier to an attractive, flowing passing philosophy knocking on the door of the Premier League. He was at the helm for almost two-hundred matches emerging the victor in eighty-six, that’s a win ratio of 44.3%. Too many draws cost him a Play Off spot in the 2011/12 campaign but it still built up the points, losing just forty-nine matches in charge. As far as first managerial jobs go, Poyet had a stormer and was highly sought after and respected in the wider football community, both at home and abroad.

Poyet Manager

Defeat in the Play Offs to your biggest rival and then a bitter fallout with the club hierarchy did mean that Poyet was enemy number one amongst sections of the Seagulls support for a time after his sacking. But to gloss over the fantastic achievements he had with the club would be foolish. Without Poyet, Brighton could well have begun life at Falmer in the bottom Division of English football and going nowhere fast. It wasn’t just results he was able to get, but he improved players too. The best example was probably with local lad Adam El-Abd, who was transformed from a big bruising old-fashioned centre-half into a ball-playing modern defender. Poyet’s fiery style and passionate displays didn’t endear him to everyone and several high-profile names fell foul of him. Nicky Forster and Glenn Murray’s partnership didn’t last nearly long enough. But he was able to attract a whole new calibre of player, the likes never seen before in Sussex. Former Valencia playmaker Vicente was somehow convinced to join and, in the limited game time he got, showed glimpses of brilliance. Kazenga LuaLua flourished. A host of other top Division players dropped down to the Championship to earn their stripes with the blue and whites. Gus Poyet was a huge factor in that. He gave us a glimpse of the potential this football club had now the stadium and training facilities had started to take shape.

Poyet Memory Lane

In his final post-match interview, he questioned if we’d ‘hit the roof’. In fact, it was quite the opposite. The foundations were laid, they just needed someone to crank it up a notch. Should Poyet have been the man to have taken the club into the Premier League? Possibly. It may have been a case of trying to go too far too soon. Brighton were not a top level club in 2013 and had overachieved to get within 180 minutes of making it. Allowing Glenn Murray to slip away for nothing in 2011, and to end up at Palace, was a terrible error of judgement and his goals we struggled to replace for a long time. Poyet’s passion would sometimes boil over into petulance, he received his marching orders from the touchline and saw rage transfer to his players on the pitch too often. Establishing the club in the second tier soon attracted interest from bigger clubs and Poyet didn’t exactly hide his delight at that. For a while it seemed we were destined to lose him to the Premier League as former stomping grounds Chelsea and Tottenham sniffed around. As much as his philosophy brought huge success, it could sometimes be stifled in the Championship as clubs learned how to counter it and frustrate Brighton. Plan B was rarely in the offing and this harmed the promotion charge in both second tier seasons. His ego got the better of him and when the final, crucial battle was won by Ian Holloway’s Palace, blame lied everywhere except at the manager’s door. In the end it became a tussle between manager and board and there would only ever be one winner. Poyet paid the price.

He was responsible for the best of times as an Albion fan. We were making headlines for the attractive football and fantastic facilities, showcasing the club and the city to the world in the process. Players flocked to Falmer from far flung corners of which Poyet was usually a big factor. We came so close to achieving the dream of top flight football, but just fell short. Poyet questioned if that was as far as the club could go. But as far as he could go with the club, come June 2013 it was adios, Gus, and thanks for the memories.

Huddersfield Poyet

BHAFC Premier League Commentaries 2019/20

img_1598Brighton just about scraped their way to safety following a dismal run towards the end of the 2018/19 campaign, surviving over Cardiff by just two points. Manager Chris Hughton seemingly paid the price as he was sacked the morning after the season concluded. Swansea boss Graham Potter was the chosen one to replace him for the Albion’s third successive top flight season. 2019 saw the start of a new Premier League broadcasting contract, with Sky and BT remaining as the dominant partners. Also entering the fray were online streaming giants Amazon, who held the rights to show two midweek rounds in full Live. Whilst the money from this domestic deal was slightly down on the previous one, there was a significant increase from overseas broadcasters making the Premier League once again an embarrassment of riches. Sky no longer held rights in Ireland but did continue to show all non-Live matches in thirty minute highlight form, meaning every game enjoyed full commentary.

Here are the full commentary details of Brighton’s third Premier League season.

# Date Fixture H/A UK TV Live / World Feed Match of the Day
1 Sat 10 Aug Watford (W3-0) A Tony Jones & Tony Gale Mark Scott
2 Sat 17 Aug West Ham (D1-1) H Guy Havord & Tony Gale John Roder
3 Sat 24 Aug Southampton (L2-0) H Gary Taphouse & Keith Andrews Simon Brotherton
4 Sat 31 Aug Manchester City (L4-0) A David Stowell & Keith Andrews Martin Fisher
5 Sat 14 Sep Burnley (D1-1) H Guy Havord & Andy Walker Robyn Cowen
6 Sat 21 Sep Newcastle (D0-0) A Sky; Bill Leslie & Alan Smith Guy Mowbray
7 Sat 28 Sep Chelsea (L2-0) A Gary Taphouse & Tony Gale Jonathan Pearce
8 Sat 5 Oct Tottenham (W3-0) H BT; Darren Fletcher & Glenn Hoddle Simon Brotherton
9 Sat 19 Oct Aston Villa (L2-1) A Rob Palmer & Iain Dowie Jonathan Pearce
10 Sat 26 Oct Everton (W3-2) H Gary Taphouse & Andy Walker Conor McNamara
11 Sat 2 Nov Norwich (W2-0) H Guy Havord & Garry Birtles John Roder
12 Sun 10 Nov Manchester United (L3-1) A David Stowell & Iain Dowie Conor McNamara
13 Sat 23 Nov Leicester (L2-0) H Guy Havord & Davie Provan Simon Brotherton
14 Sat 30 Nov Liverpool (L2-1) A David Stowell & Davie Provan Steve Wilson
15 Thu 5 Dec Arsenal (W2-1) A Amazon; Clive Tyldesley & Alan Shearer Mark Scott*
16 Sun 8 Dec Wolves (D2-2) H Sky; Bill Leslie & Andy Hinchcliffe Simon Brotherton
17 Mon 16 Dec Crystal Palace (D1-1) A Sky; Bill Leslie & Alan Smith No highlights
18 Sat 21 Dec Sheffield United (L1-0) H Gary Taphouse & Andy Walker Tony Husband
19 Thu 26 Dec Tottenham (L2-1) A Amazon; Guy Mowbray & Glenn Hoddle Guy Mowbray
20 Sat 28 Dec Bournemouth (W2-0) H Sky; Martin Tyler & Alan Smith Steve Wilson
21 Wed 1 Jan Chelsea (D1-1) H BT; Peter Drury & Glenn Hoddle Simon Brotherton
22 Sat 11 Jan Everton (L1-0) A Rob Palmer & Davie Provan Martin Fisher
23 Sat 18 Jan Aston Villa (D1-1) H Gary Taphouse & Davie Provan Steve Wilson
24 Tue 21 Jan Bournemouth (L3-1) A Rob Palmer & Garry Birtles Tony Husband
25 Sat 1 Feb West Ham (D3-3) A Tony Jones & Keith Andrews Simon Brotherton
26 Sat 8 Feb Watford (D1-1) H BT; Ian Darke & Jermaine Jenas Jonathan Pearce
27 Sat 22 Feb Sheffield United (D1-1) A Rob Palmer & Keith Andrews Alistair Mann
28 Sat 29 Feb Crystal Palace (L1-0) H BT; Darren Fletcher & Martin Keown Jonathan Pearce
29 Sat 7 Mar Wolves (D0-0) A Rob Palmer & Keith Andrews Jonathan Pearce
30 Arsenal H
31 Manchester United H
32 Norwich A
33 Liverpool H Sky;
34 Manchester City H Sky;
35 Southampton A
36 Newcastle H
37 Leicester A
38 Burnley A

Matches 10 & 14 were shown delayed in full as the Game of the Day.

*Goal clips with commentary were shown on Football Focus as MOTD aired the night before match 15.

The season had a temporary break with all football postponed from 13th March due to the global outbreak of the coronavirus.

Final Premier League position;                        [Key; WIN, DRAW, LOSE]

The Amex as seen on Premier League Match Pack

Sky Sports Match Choice 2019/20

Match Choice 2019/20 img_9656

Match Choice provided 30 minute highlights of every single non-Live Premier League game throughout the season. There was a new title sequence for this campaign, used across the Live Super Sunday, Friday Night and Saturday Night Football shows; soundtracked as the theme tune by Labrinth’s “Something’s Got to Give”. The programme remained sponsored by Renault. The titles featured each of the twenty Premier League teams with a player posing behind the team name representing them. With Anthony Knockaert leaving the Albion for Fulham, he was replaced after two seasons on Sky’s titles by Jose Izquierdo. With the winger out injured for the majority of the season, Pascal Gross was edited in to replace him on the Live coverage from December. The programme itself just uses commentary, with no host or voiceover linking in and out. Graphics were the same as this year’s Live Sky Sports set, which in itself were a tweaked version of the previous season’s graphics. Game of the Day followed the same pattern.

BBC Match of the Day 2019/20

img_9649 img_9658 img_9647 img_9648

Match of the Day went through an overhaul of its look this season, with all football related programming now being presented via a fully virtual ‘stadium studio’. This enabled the background to constantly change according to the discussion at the time. Some things should never change though, and thankfully that familiar theme tune remained in the titles. Each Premier League club featured in the intro sequence, and each of the day’s fixtures were incorporated in text form. Brighton were represented by both a flying seagull (above, bottom left) and then star striker Glenn Murray (above, bottom right), who stood alongside Harry Kane near the end of the sequence.

MOTD 19-20 Live link up MOTD Studio 360 19-20

The studio in Salford incorporated 360 degree virtual reality technology for the first time. Gary Lineker hosted on the left with his two pundits on the right. Pictured above are Alan Shearer and Ian Wright; other regulars used throughout the season included Danny Murphy, Jermaine Jenas, Phil Neville, Kevin Kilbane and Martin Keown as well as newcomers Peter Crouch, Micah Richards, Tim Cahill and Karen Carney. Graphics were unchanged from the last couple of seasons. Team line ups used images of the players laid out in formation if it was a main game, shorter highlights edits had the player pictures animate on the lower third of the screen. Lineker would often speak to one manager after the match (above, top left) via videolink, with the commentators conducting the rest of the chats.

MOTD 19-20 MOTD Brighton Background 2019 MOTD line up 2019 MOTD Line ups 2019

BBC Match of the Day 2 2019/20

img_9655 img_9681

Highlights of Sunday matches were broadcast on Match of the Day 2, shown on BBC One around 10.30pm each matchweek. The titles were a slightly modified version of the main show’s, with many clubs having a different player representing them on Sunday to Saturday. This season, new signing Neal Maupay was the Brighton man featured in the MotD2 opening sequence fresh from his debut goal. Once again, Mark Chapman was the regular host in the studio. He was sat in the middle of his two pundits, with the studio design adopting blue virtual stadium seating colours to contrast it with the red on the main show. In the screenshot below left, Chapman was joined by Tim Cahill and Danny Murphy. The show utilised the regular pool of BBC pundits listed above but also included guests from the world of football such as current and former managers, current players and footballers recently out of retirement. Additionally, semi-regular pundits who didn’t tend to appear on the main show did on MotD2 and the FA Cup highlights; Mark Lawrenson, Dion Dublin, Alex Scott, Jon Walters and Leon Osman. The rest of the programme followed the familiar pattern with round ups of the previous day and a lighter look at the weekend. Graphics were the same as used on MotD.

img_9683

VAR; Video Assistant Referee

img_9688 img_9702

The use of VAR was introduced to all Premier League matches from the beginning of the season, having been trialled in the FA Cup and League Cup in the previous year or two and at the FIFA World Cup in Russia 2018. This was given its own graphics and font used across all broadcasters worldwide. Although there were teething problems and a lack of clear communications, VAR was implemented to aid the on-field referee using replays and various angles and graphics to try to eliminate match changing mistakes. Stockley Park in West London was the location of the VAR room for all Premier League matches this campaign. The implementation of it was a total shambles.

FA Cup 2017

BBC Match of the Day broadcast highlights and goals from the FA Cup this season, many with full commentary edits, whilst both they and BT Sport held the Live rights. After last season’s run to the Semis, Brighton crashed out at the first stage this year to Championship side Sheffield Wednesday.

R3 Sat 4 Jan Sheffield Weds (L1-0) H World Feed & MOTD; Matt Davies-Adams

Small Screen Seagulls; The Dignity and Class of Chris Hughton

Small Screen Seagulls LogoChris Hughton is often referred to as one of the nicest characters in football, and rightly so. His pre and post-match interviews are conducted with honesty, respect and always amiable. In an industry increasingly full of loud, brash, soundbite-grabbers, Hughton is a charming contrast. He is a quiet, intelligent thinker and as such doesn’t tend to be at the forefront of media coverage. Punditry appearances are rare, long-form magazine programme interviews infrequent. His television opportunities are largely centred around press conferences and matchdays. That’s not to say that he didn’t feature from time to time. During his tenure as Brighton manager he became an ambassador figure for the city, particularly as the achievements on the pitch began to mount. He was bestowed the freedom of the city by the Council following promotion to the Premier League in May 2017. The University of Sussex awarded him an honorary degree in January 2019, citing ‘considerable success in his field despite barriers’. This was in reference to being one of a very select few managers in the English game at the time coming from a Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) background, for whom Hughton could be seen as a role model. This post takes a look back at some of the features the boss was a part of around his time at the Albion. The two stand-out themes throughout were dignity and class.


Chris Hughton, Brighton Manager 31st Dec 2014-13th May 2019

Chris Hughton
Chris Hughton with Ciaran Moynan and myself in 2015

The morning after Brighton and Hove Albion’s second Premier League season in succession came to a close, with Manchester City clinching the title at The Amex in front of the watching world, our manager Chris Hughton was relieved of his duties after four and a half years at the helm. I think ‘relieved’ is an appropriate word in this story. After a catastrophic collapse which saw the Albion freefall from mid-table at Christmas down to just two points off the drop come the final day, there was huge relief for the fans that nearest survival rivals Cardiff were not good enough to claim the necessary points to overtake. Brighton survived due to others incompetence as opposed to hauling themselves out of danger. There was relief from the Owner and Chairman Tony Bloom that his team would still be in the top-flight next season when at times it looked precarious. And perhaps there may even be a modicum of relief for Chris Hughton himself, that he exits the club as one of the most successful managers the Seagulls have ever seen, having done the jobs he set out to do upon appointment on New Year’s Eve 2014.

It’s debatable how much further he could have taken the club and, unlike his time at Norwich, he departed on good terms with the fans. He was able to see out the full season and achieve the primary objective of staying up. It’s very unfortunate that it had to end in this way – he couldn’t finish it on his own terms – because Hughton conducted himself admirably at all times and got the results on the field. His tenure will never be forgotten by the Albion faithful and we will always owe him a huge debt of gratitude for salvaging a bit of a mess under Sami Hyypia, rousing the troops to keep an underperforming squad in the Championship when a place in League One was calling. In his first full season the transformation was underway; the club started the season with a record unbeaten run which saw the Seagulls sit amongst the top three or four clubs from the beginning to the end. It wasn’t quite to be, missing out on automatic promotion on goal difference to Middlesbrough, but that did not halt the charge. The following season the promised land of the Premier League was reached in style, Brighton blew away the rest of the chasing pack and finished behind only his former side Newcastle to take their place amongst the country’s elite. The honour had alluded the club for thirty-four years. The achievement in itself was huge, perhaps no better day was had under Hughton than when it was finally secured on Easter Monday against Wigan at The Amex. The manner of the victories, with exciting attacking football and high-scoring victories, brought about excitement and interest from the rest of the country.

Hughton Promotion

Ahead of his Premier League challenge, the squad was strengthened significantly. Home form was crucial as Fortress Falmer stopped all but the biggest teams from claiming victory. A win over Manchester United had fans pinching themselves as another season in the big League was clinched with time to spare. The second season in the Premier League began with more expectation but double the pressure as big spending teams came up from the Division below. The first half of that campaign saw similar results, home form claiming wins over Everton, West Ham and – once again – Manchester United. But the tide turned after Christmas. Certain sections of the home support were getting restless about a negative approach that was adopted in order to counter the undoubted superiority many top flight teams had over us. Goals were hard to come by, players were under-performing and Chris Hughton changed tactics in a bid to improve. The change in formation from a flexible 4-4-1-1 in 2017 to a rigid 4-5-1/4-3-3 this time was plainly not producing the desired effect. The lone striker was isolated, as support from the wing was restricted due to a defensive, negative set up. The dreadful run of form in 2019 saw Brighton freefall down the table to the point where, for the first time, questions were raised about the security of his job. The lowest moment of his time in charge came when Bournemouth put five past us on the Saturday followed by the team hot on our heels – Cardiff – striking a further two goals without reply just three days later. Morale had hit rock-bottom but Hughton remained calm and managed to steer the ship to safety with two games of the season still to play. Despite this and reaching a first FA Cup Semi Final since 1983, Tony Bloom’s mind was made up and the parting of the ways came on Monday 13th May 2019.

Hughton Manager of the Month

Chris Hughton’s level-headed, conservative nature was in step with his solid, defend-from-the-front football. He was extremely likeable, had time to stop and chat to everybody and was always an absolute credit in the way he conducted himself at the Albion. His achievements surpass any manager the club has had in the modern era; only Jimmy Melia had taken Albion to a Wembley in the Cup before, and only Alan Mullery had won promotion to the top flight some, forty years ago. Hughton became the first BAME boss to win the Premier League’s Manager of the Month Award when he picked up the honour in February 2018. And he created a family atmosphere and togetherness within the club which was never more abundant than when the entire squad flew to France for the funeral of Anthony Knockaert’s father in November 2016. The win ratio of 41% under Hughton is particularly impressive given almost half of that time was spent in the Premier League, highlighting just how good a job he did. Let’s take a look at some of the standout appearances he made on our television screens, beginning with his reaction to being linked to the job in the week that Sami Hyypia left.

 

Goals on Sunday, Sky Sports 1 (28th December 2014)

GOS Studio GOS Hughton

Chris Hughton was a guest on Sky Sports long-running morning review show Goals on Sunday just after Christmas in 2014 alongside fellow job seeking manager Uwe Rosler. Hughton had been out of work since being dismissed by Norwich back in April, with the club in seventeenth position coming towards the end of their second Premier League season. In the period since, he was offered jobs as an assistant to other top flight clubs but was holding out for the main job. With Crystal Palace sacking Neil Warnock the day before this programme, Hughton was linked with that as well as being named by some bookmakers as the favourite for the Brighton job. When hosts Ben Shephard and Chris Kamara put this to Hughton, he replied “The good thing for myself is when a job becomes available, I’m still getting linked with these positions.” He went on to explain that when in situations such as this, he believed it to be the club that should make any further comment and drive the negotiations forward; “If you’ve been linked and have spoken to a club, then I think the onus is on them to make that known as opposed to yourself. So yes I want to get back in at the best level possible.” When pressed which of Palace and the Albion he’d prefer, Hughton remained ever the diplomat; “I think on their own merits they’re both very good jobs.” He did, though, point out the great facilities in Sussex; “Brighton have a wonderful structure, a wonderful stadium, new training facility and, of course, they are a side that have been very close to the Play Offs in two previous seasons.” And three days later, Chris Hughton was appointed the permanent manager of Brighton and Hove Albion on an initial three-and-a-half-year contract with the club twenty-first in the Championship table.

GOS Presenters GOS Guests


My Icon: Chris Hughton, Sky Sports Mix (13th October 2017)

My Icon 2017 ICON Hughton

During every day of October 2017, Sky Sports released a new episode of the series My Icon, which was a collection of short ten to fifteen minute films interviewing stars from the world of sport of a BAME background. Such participants included the likes of Thierry Henry, Rachel Yankey, Anthony Joshua and Maggie Alphonsi. The fourteenth episode of the series was with our very own Chris Hughton, with the programme synopsis stating he “discusses the individuals that have inspired him during his life and career.” Hughton enjoyed a successful playing career, especially at Tottenham where he won the FA Cup and UEFA Cup. He became the first full international player for the Republic of Ireland to come from a black background. In this film he spoke of the racism that he and other players had to endure on an all-too frequent basis from opposition supporters during his playing days; “It was something that we, and I, experienced on a regular basis… I don’t think any black footballer growing up and playing in the late ’70s and ’80s would not have experienced it.” At the time of the interview, Hughton was one of a very tiny few managers in the English game of black origin and repeated calls were made to change that to make coaching and jobs of authority in the game more inclusive. Hughton explained; “I don’t think that there’s anybody in football that doesn’t want to see a diverse game. A diverse game means not only of course on the football pitch where the makeup of what plays on a football pitch, that means in managerial level, that means in boardroom level, that means in other aspects of football in higher positions.” He called for people already representing the sport to use their platform to encourage others; “I think it’s the responsibility of us in the game, for the stakeholders in the game, to not only show enthusiasm, but to put that enthusiasm into action.”  Chris Hughton is a fantastic role model for all footballers, not just minorities, with what he has achieved as a player, an assistant coach at Tottenham and Newcastle and of course his three Premier League promotions thus far as the gaffer. The manner in which he conducts himself should be seen as a blueprint for others. He speaks with authority, passion and decency on sensitive issues like race and diversity, as demonstrated during this film.

ICON Interview ICON Dressing Room


The Premier League Show, BBC Two (27th September 2018)

Premier League Show titles PLShow Training ground

To coincide with a new broadcast rights deal, the BBC launched an additional regular weekly magazine programme called The Premier League Show at the start of the 2016/17 season, focussing on all matter top flight. It gave them an extra flexibility to discuss matters off the pitch in greater detail and in longer form. When Brighton gained promotion to the elite League in 2017, a report was shown about the club’s journey. And the BBC Sport cameras returned during the opening weeks of the 2018/19 campaign as Match of the Day host, and former Tottenham colleague, went to the American Express Elite Football Performance Centre in Lancing (AKA the training ground to you and I) for his first visit to discuss a whole host of topics with Chris Hughton as he embarked upon his second Premier League season with the Albion. The report began with Lineker and Hughton embracing in his office whilst various members of the club, such as captain Bruno and Chief Executive Paul Barber, gave glowing reports of the manager’s characteristics. “Chris’s stock is as high as any manager that we’ve had here in the club’s history and long may that continue” Barber noted. A glowing tribute was also paid by the club’s Football Admin Manager Suzi Swadling, saying “He’s very personable with all of us. He knows everyone by name from everyone he works close with down to the cleaners.” This would’ve come as little surprise to any Albion fan, he made time for the lot of us. Lineker asked Hughton if he was ‘too nice’ to be a football manager; “In as many situations as possible I’m fair, that’s what I’d like to think. But you can’t be nice all the time… We have to make so many tough decisions.”

PLShow Interview PLShow Hughton

Along with Sean Dyche of Burnley and Eddie Howe of Bournemouth, Chris Hughton was amongst the longest serving British and Irish managers in the Division. When asked if he would prefer to be managing the Champions League teams, he responded “I generally only think of the job where I am at the moment. My ambitions are not to manage at the top clubs, my ambitions are to do the very best job that I can in the job that I’m doing.” Many others would have used that question to berate his lack of opportunities for himself or British managers, like Sam Allardyce has in the past, or use it to launch a personal bid to get a bigger job, in the way Jose Mourinho has. That wasn’t on Hughton’s radar. The question of race naturally came up, as it did during his appearance on My Icon. The progress slowly being made, with conversations at the very least being had, encouraged Hughton; “We are at a different phase at the moment. There’s no doubt there’s a huge imbalance… [In the past] Black players were seen as good athletes, good forward players but not captain material, not managerial material. I think it persisted because of society.” Similar subjects to the previous film were touched upon here, as he told of having to put up with racist abuse from opposition players and fans; “You had to work through it really on your own. Although you had a supportive team behind you, you generally didn’t talk about these issues.” Looking at his own club Brighton, Hughton saw changes at the grass roots level where lots of players from all backgrounds would be training and progressing but the changes weren’t replicated at the highest levels of the game.

PLShow Barber PLShow Embrace

The report concluded by discussing Hughton the coach. “I like a team that’s organised and prepared to work hard for each other. If you are able to bring in gifted players, it’s more about making sure them gifted players fit in to what we do here.” When mentioning teams that played a more expansive style, Lineker asked if that would be a recipe for disaster for Brighton. “For us, yes. I think for those that do play that way with the players that they’ve got it’s wonderful to see… At this moment we’re playing in the top League, we’re playing against teams that have spent more money, have better players than us so they’re great challenges.” So, when the time comes around and he beats a team like Manchester United, as the Albion did a few weeks before this interview, it’s all the more special for Hughton; “It’s what you work for and for a club like this, that feeling lasts for a while.” An extended version of the broadcast interview can be viewed below.


BBC South East Today, BBC One South (13th May 2019)

SET Titles SET Presenters

On the early evening of Monday 13th May, local BBC news programme South East Today reported on the news that Chris Hughton had been dismissed from Brighton after four-and-a-half-years in charge. The feature was the second story of the bulletin hosted by regular presenters Rob Smith and Natalie Graham. As of the digital switchover in 2012, BBC viewers in Brighton and Hove began receiving the South East version of the programme, replacing the old South Today which would continue to serve West Sussex and beyond. Our hosts introduced the report by listing a number of achievements – good and bad – during Hughton’s reign; “In total he was in charge for 215 games and had a win rate of almost 41%. But this season the Seagulls fell rather flat, winning just three of their last twenty-three games in the League.” They also cited chairman Tony Bloom’s comment about it being “undoubtedly the most difficult decision” he’s had to take before playing out Ian Palmer’s report. This began with footage from the previous day’s final match of the season, with Hughton speaking with the Match of the Day reporter in the tunnel. He spoke of the year ahead and how the job was getting increasingly tougher, clearly unaware of the news to come. “We want to be better next season and we will need to be because, if anything, this Division is getting more demanding”.

SET Studio SET Hughton

Palmer’s report outlined the season just gone, with the positive mid-table start deteriorating after the New Year particularly away from home before narrowly surviving ahead of the nearest rivals. Journalist and club website contributor Nick Szczepanik was interviewed with the stadium in the horizon. He told how close the relegation battle ended up being; “The actual margin of safety ended up being only two points over Cardiff City in the end. That all hinged on one result which was out of Brighton’s hands – Crystal Palace winning at Cardiff.” We then heard brief soundbites from local residents, perhaps fans, who gave the usual mixed reactions of ‘disappointed’, ‘shock’, ‘a shame’ and ‘maybe it’s time for a change?’ As insightful as any vox-pop has ever been. The report concluded with shots of departing captain Bruno now being followed out the door by the manager. Reporter Ian Palmer remained nearby to The Amex in the blinding sunshine for a Live link-up with the studio. He was able to give further context to the recent reactions of some supporters stating; “There has been a lot of disquiet amongst some fans for quite some time, particularly on social media. A lot saying that Chris Hughton’s tactics were negative, they were defensive and frankly some had become rather tired of watching that style of football.” Whilst this was true, I think there were still large sections of the support who were behind Hughton, but this wasn’t really covered. He ended by shoehorning in a bizarre and quite unrelated comparison to the leadership of the Conservative Party, whereby changing the person at the top doesn’t necessarily change the numbers of the vote or something along those lines – basically suggesting a lot of money would be required on players over the summer and the right appointment would be crucial. It didn’t quite work but you could kind of see what he was hinting at. Little was made of the togetherness, overall record and fantastic times Hughton brought to the club, instead concentrating on the poor run of form in recent months. Perhaps if the story was covered by the dedicated sports reporter more would have been made of this as Hughton deserved plaudits for the fantastic job he did.

SET Szczepanik SET Reporter


BT Hughton

Whilst Hughton’s personal appearances in the mainstream national media were all too sparse, he was in charge when Live match exposure had never been greater for the Seagulls on the small screen. Of the 215 matches he was at the helm for, 66 of them were broadcast Live in the UK with even more made available around the globe. His televised win ratio was just shy of his overall record – with 34.85% or just over one-in-three. A quarter of them were draws, as his safety first approach at the top level paid dividends. Some of his highest highs were in front of the cameras, with back-to-back victories over Manchester United, beating Crystal Palace home and away, a penalty shoot-out win at Millwall to set up a Cup Semi at the National Stadium, comprehensive Championship triumphs over Leeds, QPR, Nottingham Forest and Brentford amongst others, whilst crucial points were picked up twice versus Arsenal, at home to Spurs and the goal that all but secured survival second time around against Newcastle in his penultimate Amex match. The club goals of the season from Knockaert at Palace in 2019 and Steve Sidwell from the half-way line in Bristol back in 2016 were both Live and the rarity of a match having to switch channels occurred when the West Brom Cup Replay went into Extra Time on BBC One then Two! Chris Hughton’s calm, measured interviews were a staple of these broadcasts. He never got too carried away or ahead of himself, he maintained the quiet dignity and class for which the title of this post is all about. The Chris Hughton we saw week in, week out on the touchline came across well on the screen. He brought tremendous success to the South Coast at a tricky time. He leaves with his head held high as he no doubt walks quickly into another job. He restored immense pride to the city. For all that and much, much more, I cannot thank the gentleman enough. There’s only one Chrissy Hughton.

Sky Hughton

#4: Brighton Women 0-4 Arsenal Women 28/04/2019

#4 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0-4 ARSENAL WOMEN Women’s Super League
Sunday 28th April 2019 BT 2015

ARSW Titles

PRESENTER Clare Balding GUEST Alicia Ferguson-Cook
COMMENTATORS Adam Summerton & Lucy Ward REPORTER Connie McLaughlin
12.15pm Kick Off; Amex Stadium     12-2.30pm Live on BT Sport 2

ARSW Sting ARSW Sting 2 ARSW Intro

Context of the Match: Approaching the business end of the season, today was Brighton’s final home match in their debut season in the Women’s Super League; England’s top professional Division. The campaign was thought of a success; reaching the Quarter Finals of the WSL Continental Cup, the Fourth Round of the SSE Women’s FA Cup and securing survival in the top flight for another year with games to spare. Victories were extremely hard to come by, with as many in the Cups as in the League – three in each thus far. In the WSL, only one team were relegated to the Championship and for a long time there was a three-way battle between the Albion, Everton and Yeovil to avoid the drop. This came to a premature conclusion at the end of March when struggling Yeovil Town Ladies were forced into administration amidst huge budget cuts. This gave them a ten-point deduction from the Football Association and, having already secured the lowest number of points of any team with just five at the time, were a long way from safety on a negative tally. Relegation was then confirmed mid-April with a five-nil home defeat to Reading. This boosted the confidence of Brighton, now able to play the final couple of rounds safe in the knowledge that they would be a WSL club again. Today’s opponents Arsenal in contrast had everything to play for; a win would secure them the League title for the first time since 2012. The Gunners ran out four-one winners in the reverse fixture back in November, Live on the BBC Red Button, and were strong favourites ahead of this one. Albion chiefs elected to host the match at the American Express Community Stadium in Falmer for its first Super League game, instead of the usual home in Crawley. A bumper crowd was anticipated with men’s team season ticket holders able to claim a free ticket. Attention was heightened as BT Sport broadcast the match Live to the nation at the earlier time of a 12.15pm kick off. With the World Cup to come in France in the summer, a season-long behind the scenes BBC documentary on West Ham United Women, the FA Cup Final this coming Saturday evening Live in primetime and the launch of a new terrestrial magazine programme last weekend, the spotlight was increasingly shining on the Women’s game.

ARSW Brighton ARSW Arsenal ARSW Formations

The Teams: Hope Powell made two changes from the defeat to Reading last time out. Emily Simpkins came in for her second League start of the season in the middle, whilst Tory Williams returned at the back. Longest serving player Kirsty Barton’s more familiar in midfield but reverted to right back for this one. She appeared in both previous women’s matches held at this stadium; a two-nil victory over Charlton in May 2015 and a three-one win against Sheffield two years ago. On the left wing, Aileen Whelan was named the club’s Player of the Season, as chosen by the coaching staff. Kate Natkiel grew up through the ranks at Arsenal whilst captain Dani Buet spent seven years there. Republic of Ireland international Megan Connolly joined the club in January from College football in America. Wales international Kayleigh Green led the line up top hoping to add to her solitary League goal this term. Ini Umotong scored the opener in the reverse fixture in Boreham Wood but began on the bench today. She was joined by Northern Ireland international defender Laura Rafferty who had recently recovered from injury having missed the past couple of months. Joe Montemurro’s high flyers needed just one more victory to secure the title and named the same starting eleven as last week’s win over Everton. Defender Leah Williamson, a graduate of the Arsenal academy, and striker Beth Mead will both be hoping to go to the World Cup in Phil Neville’s England squad in the summer. Midfielders Dominique Bloodworth and Danielle Van de Donk were amongst the scorers in the four-one win over the Seagulls in November. Captain Kim Little won the League with Arsenal when they last claimed the title seven years ago. Striker Vivianne Miedema broke the record for most number of goals in a WSL season back in December and was looking to add to her tally of seventeen; a figure higher than the entire Albion squad’s goals to date. She was also named PFA Women’s Player of the Year for this season. The referee was Lucy Oliver, whose husband Michael officiates in the men’s game.

ARSW Balding ARSW Ferguson ARSW Studio

Presentation Team: Hugely popular multi-sport broadcaster Clare Balding anchored BT’s coverage of today’s fixture. A former amateur jockey, Balding made her name hosting horse racing on firstly the BBC before switching to Channel 4 when they secured exclusive terrestrial rights from 2013. She’s also the lead presenter for BBC Sport on major Games such as the Olympics and Commonwealths, earning ‘national treasure’ status for her superb handling of the swimming during London 2012. With her stock at its highest following those Games, her freelance work stretched across multiple broadcasters on a wide range of sports; from Rugby League and the Boat Race on the BBC, Crufts on Channel 4 and her own sporting chat show on BT Sport. In 2017 she fronted Four’s coverage of the Women’s European Championship football – her first step into this sport – and has maintained links since. Balding has presented the odd WSL match for BT previously and is the face of the new Channel 4 magazine programme Women’s Football World which launched Saturday morning. Alongside her at The Amex was former Australian international striker Alicia Ferguson-Cook. Having spent most of her playing career in her native land, she moved to England for work purposes and was used by ESPN as a pundit on the newly-launched professional WSL. She also worked for the American version during the 2011 World Cup. Whilst in England she resumed her playing career, joining Millwall Lionesses for a couple of years before retiring in 2013 to move full-time in media, specifically production. Her current role is behind the scenes, as a producer on Women’s Football World and with production company Sunset+Vine. In the commentary box were regular pairing Adam Summerton and Lucy Ward. Summerton is the voice of BT’s National League coverage alongside ex-Albion man Adam Virgo. Additionally, he’s used across Europa and Champions League games, European Leagues and England Senior Women’s and Men’s under-21 internationals, all on BT Sport. Prior to this he worked for Manchester United’s club station MUTV from 2007, taking over hosting and commentary duties from Steve Bower. Coincidentally he went on to also replace Bower on Conference and Women’s football with BT. Lucy Ward is the UK’s premier co-commentator on Women’s football, having been behind the mic for well over a decade across ESPN, BBC, Channel 4 and BT. With a strong Yorkshire accent, she spent her entire playing career there with Leeds and Doncaster before carving out a hugely successful media career. Completing the presentation line up was touchline reporter Connie McLaughlin. Having begun her media career in her resident Scotland, he made her name with BBC Radio hosting and reporting various sports programmes where she still contributes to this day. In the past eighteen months she’s been a regular on BT Sport, providing in-game updates on the biggest Scottish football match of the day for results service BT Sport Score. She also occasionally features on their SPFL Live coverage.

ARSW Dugout ARSW Warm Up ARSW Powell ARSW Nobbs

The Coverage: This was the penultimate Live match of the WSL season for BT Sport, who came on air fifteen minutes prior to the 12.15pm kick off. Host Clare Balding began the programme by interviewing Arsenal Women’s coach Joe Montemurro in the dugout before handing over to reporter Connie McLaughlin who was speaking with Albion coach Hope Powell in the tunnel. When asked if playing today’s match at The Amex brought on extra pressure, Powell said “Probably there will be some pressure. The crowd that’s expected is probably the biggest they will have played in front of so that in itself brings a little bit of pressure. But really we want them to enjoy the occasion. They’ve got to showcase themselves.” Balding then moved to the pitchside position from which the rest of today’s coverage would be presented from, in front of an empty West Stand, where she was accompanied by pundit Alicia Ferguson-Cook (captioned just as Alicia Ferguson throughout). They began by discussing the WSL as a whole and how initiatives like this, housing a match at the main stadium, will only improve upon the integrity and quality of the League. Ferguson-Cook highlighted Ini Umotong’s absence from the Albion starting XI, explaining she’s expected to come on in the second half, but emphasising how impressive she has been this season with pace and strength up front. However today was Arsenal’s day and they were focussed on for much of the build up as they attempted to secure the WSL title. Injured midfielder Jordan Nobbs joined the pundits pitchside to give an insight into the buoyant dressing room. She also discussed the key Arsenal players; record-breaking goalscorer Vivianne Miedema and fellow Dutch international Danielle Van de Donk. Clips of Scotland’s Kim Little were ran, showcasing her influence this campaign. An advert break separated the chat from the action, after which Balding handed over to commentary team Adam Summerton and Lucy Ward with the players ready to emerge from the tunnel.

ARSW Team of the Season ARSW Miedema ARSW BT Box ARSW Celebrations

At half time Balding and Ferguson-Cook analysed the key moments including both Arsenal goals. Miedema’s footwork was praised for the first goal whilst her vision was crucial to the second. The gap in quality between the home and away sides was evident. The presentation team also looked through the PFA Women’s Team of the Year, with three Arsenal representatives as well as several England players. Manchester City captain Steph Houghton and striker Nikita Parris were named, as was Demi Stokes and Chelsea’s Hannah Blundell; all of whom were set to join Phil Neville’s National side at the World Cup in June. The aim of BT’s WSL coverage is to be as inclusive as possible, whether you’re a first time viewer or seasoned fan. After the match, around fifteen minutes were afforded to wrap things up and celebrate the Arsenal title victory. The trophy wouldn’t be presented today – that would come during their Live broadcast in two weeks time at Boreham Wood when the season concludes – but the emotions were poured out and the joy evident on the Gunners players. The cameras joined the team on the pitch as their huddle took place for a quick debrief with the manager before they all burst into song and chants of “Championes!” Reporter Connie McLaughlin spoke to two of the scorers in the centre circle; Beth Mead and Vivianne Miedema. Many of the record crowd stayed behind to join in with Arsenal’s triumph as the PA system blasted out Queen’s We Are the Champions. Following an advert break, we returned to our pitchside position to review the match with our host and pundit who were joined by a few of the Arsenal squad and proud boss Joe Montemurro. Captain Kim Little was alongside him firstly, singing the praises of her teammates. In a moment of inevitability, Danielle Van de Donk gatecrashed the interview to spray her captain and manager with water bottles. Of course, Clare Balding wasn’t immune and had to try and jump out of the way, to little avail! Talk immediately turned to next season and how Arsenal could improve upon this, with European glory the next aim. The final few minutes were devoted to analysing the terrific finishes in the second half that doubled Arsenal’s lead from two to four-nil. The BT Box – picture-in picture – was utilised as Player of the Match Van de Donk joined the team to review her own goal before it was time to sign off as another top class broadcast came to a close in an historic year for the Albion Women; the first season they’ve had Live television exposure and four matches to boot. They’d be back in the top flight for another campaign in the autumn and we look forward to further coverage of this ever-improving club.

ARSW Kick Off ARSW Comms ARSW Huddle ARSW Yellow

Story of the Match: The Sunday afternoon kick off saw a record Women’s Super League attendance of 5,265 flock to The Amex to witness the matchup between debutants Brighton and title-chasing Arsenal. The previous record also featured the Gunners, when 5,052 saw them face Chelsea at the Emirates Stadium back in 2012. The spectators didn’t have to wait long for the opening goal, a fantastic strike from Arsenal’s top scorer Vivianne Miedema. The Dutch striker dispossessed Tory Williams almost twenty-five yards out before unleashing a fierce shot. The effort fizzed past ‘keeper Marie Hourihan, whose fingertips brushed the ball before it crashed down over the line off the crossbar. The visitors were in the ascendancy, controlling possession and dominating chances. The second goal came after some nice play between Kim Little, Miedema and eventual scorer Katie McCabe. Little on the left found Miedema centrally. She chipped the ball over the Albion defence for Ireland captain McCabe to run onto. Using her body to shield the ball from defender Williams, she was able just to help the ball in with her outstretched left foot past Hourihan and into the far corner to double the deficit. Commentator Adam Summerton surmised; “They play some of the best women’s football in the country, Arsenal, and there was a fine example of it. A great move rounded off superbly by McCabe.” Later in the half Williams had to deny Arsenal a third, heading Quinn’s looping effort off the line from a corner. That ensured the scoreline remained just two at the break.

ARSW Mead Goal ARSW Umotong Sub ARSW Champions

Brighton began well in the second period and had their first proper opening early on. Skipper Dani Buet’s cross from twenty-five yards on the far side got the better of Arsenal’s failed offside trap but had just too much on it for Aileen Whelan to nip in. Sari van Veenendaal in goal had to get down low to her right to palm the ball behind. For all the encouragement in this half for the home side, the goal wasn’t coming and shots on target were few and far between. Meanwhile Arsenal looked a danger from every attack and with twenty minutes left on the clock, they put the game and indeed the title to bed with one of the goals of the season. The visitors won the ball back around the half way line and were quick to break forward. Van de Donk stroked a ball towards the left wing where Beth Mead was running to. Her first two touches controlled the ball before taking it past Barton to run into a bit of space. She took just two further touches to dribble forward before firing an unstoppable curler into the top left-hand corner of Hourihan’s goal. The Albion ‘keeper could get nowhere near it, struck to perfection it looked a better goal with each replay shown. The trajectory of the ball barely moved as it sailed in from more than thirty yards. Her celebration included running over to the bench where England teammate Jordan Nobbs was watching on; a long-term absentee which ruled her out of the upcoming World Cup. And the icing was put on the cake six minutes later with Arsenal’s fourth. Miedema’s cross was part-cleared by the back of Barton. The loose ball was picked up by Van de Donk who laid it off for Little. She returned the favour to Van de Donk who given space on the edge of the box to roll the ball with her studs and calmly place it into the bottom right of the net. Brighton went close to a consolation goal in stoppage time when the impressive Megan Connolly saw her right-footed attempt land just wide of the post from outside the area but it was Arsenal’s day in the Sussex Downs as they ran out four-nil winners and in the process became League Champions with a game to spare. Brighton’s aim would be to end the season on a high in two weeks’ time and a trip to FA Cup finalists West Ham, but survival was the overriding aim at the beginning of the campaign and that had been secured. The next women’s football at this stadium would see the England national team make their final preparations ahead of the World Cup in France with a friendly against New Zealand in June.

ARSW Table

BRIGHTON WOMEN 0 ARSENAL WOMEN 4
Miedema, McCabe, Mead, Van de Donk

ARSW Replay

 

EXTRA; BBC magazine programme The Women’s Football Show came from pitchside at The Amex today for the first time following this match with Arsenal. Broadcast on BBC One at 11.45pm after Premier League highlights on Match of the Day 2, the thirty-five minute show was hosted by Reshmin Chowdhury. The main focus was the match between Brighton and Arsenal, highlights of which formed the first half of the show. The extended edit had commentary as BT Sport, provided by Adam Summerton and Lucy Ward. This was the usual case that the highlights used the commentary from the Live matches shown on BT and BBC Red Button as well as the WSL Facebook stream.

Women's Football Show WFS Chowdhury

After the match, and with Arsenal securing the title with the win, reaction came from captain Kim Little and manager Joe Montemurro pitchside with Chowdhury. She then linked to highlights and round-ups of the other matches, as commentary was provided by Chris Sharples whilst Lynsey Hooper narrated. Following this, Brighton defender Laura Rafferty joined the presenter pitchside to discuss the Albion’s first season in the WSL and the aims of the club. Rafferty plays an important role as a Club ambassador and is often the poster girl for the Women’s team. She explained “It’s been busy, half of the team have come from being part-time to going full-time so it is a massive transition for the club.” The show continued with a further round-up and a look at the table before glancing at the Championship results and table. It concluded with a brief highlights edit of the Live Red Button match earlier today; Chelsea versus Lyon in the Champions League Semi Final 2nd Leg and comment about Youth Finals.

WFS Comms WFS RaffertyWFS Two Shot

 

PREVIOUS; #3 BRIGHTON WOMEN 0-4 CHELSEA WOMEN 09/12/2018

NEXT; #5 ARSENAL WOMEN 4-0 BRIGHTON WOMEN 29/09/2019