#10: Stoke 3-1 Brighton 01/03/2002

#10 STOKE 3-1 BRIGHTON Division Two
Friday 1st March 2002 ITV Sport Channel grab

STO Titles

PRESENTER Simon Hill GUESTS Tony Dorigo & John Hendrie
COMMENTATORS Guy Havord & Jim Beglin REPORTER Peter Stevenson
7.45pm Kick Off; Britannia Stadium, Stoke      7.30-10pm Football League Live on ITV Sport Channel

STO Promo STO Sponsor STO Intro

Context of the Match: The second and final match of Brighton’s to be broadcast Live on the ITV Sport Channel saw the Albion travel to the Potteries on the first Friday of March. The fixture promised to be a crucial one in the race for promotion to Division One, as second place travelled to fourth; five points separated us from Stoke. With a game in hand over table-toppers Reading, and six points worse off, a win for Brighton would not only close the gap on the leaders but also widen the difference from the chasing pack; only two would be automatically promoted. When these two met back in September at Withdean, the Albion ran out one-nil victors thanks to Paul Watson’s last minute winner. Since the last televised match back in January – the horrific four nil defeat at Brentford on ITV – Brighton had lost just once in seven, away at Oldham. The home form at fortress Withdean had been excellent all season for Peter Taylor, just a solitary defeat thus far to the Bees of Brentford. It was on the road where defeats were on the increase, with three since the turn of the year. With ten games remaining, both teams were in a good place to secure a top six spot. But, having been near the top all season, the Seagulls wanted more. They were eyeing up the automatic places for the second successive season. With six further games to come in March, this was the beginning of a crucial period as matches came thick and fast. Gudjon Thordarson’s Stoke side knew all about that end of season pressure, having been unsuccessful in the Play Offs in each of the previous two seasons. After an indifferent start, it was the defeat at Brighton which sparked Stoke into life, winning eight and drawing two of their next ten games. However, things began to fall apart after the new year, losing five out of nine. They got back to winning ways at the Britannia last weekend thanks to a four-nil victory over Bury. Tonight’s match, a few days ahead of the thirtieth anniversary of Stoke’s famous League Cup triumph over Chelsea at Wembley, was sure to be crucial in the fight at the top. The ITV Sport Channel team were present and correct to beam it direct to our screens.

STO Stoke STO Formation STO Brighton

The Teams: The Albion made three changes from the midweek draw at Bournemouth. Simon Morgan was rested for that one, but his presence is required up against a physical, tall Stoke side. Youth product Adam Virgo dropped out. The key absentee remained Bobby Zamora, serving the third and final match of his suspension following a red card during the two-nil defeat at Oldham. Eighteen-year-old Chris McPhee took his place for the first two matches, marking another full debut for an academy player, but Lee Steele was preferred tonight. The third change saw Gary Hart come into the eleven in place of Steve Melton. Junior Lewis linked up with Peter Taylor once again, having worked together most recently at Leicester. The loanee joined at the start of February and has featured in all six games since. Brighton’s formation will be a 4-3-3 come 4-5-1, placing emphasis on the wide play of Hart and Paul Brooker to get forward and support Steele as much as possible. Robbie Pethick joined in the summer ahead of the step up to Division Two, having spent six years and around 200 appearances at Portsmouth. Two years at Bristol Rovers followed for the versatile defender pushing up into midfield here. Richard Carpenter formed the lynchpin in the middle of the park. He protected the back line featuring the ever-dependant Danny Cullip and long-serving full backs Paul Watson and Kerry Mayo. Michel Kuipers kept goal, returning to the side at the end of January having missed the previous month through injury. Peter Taylor did not name a goalkeeper on the bench for the sixth game in a row, with only the inexperience of Will Packham and coach John Keeley eligible ‘keepers on the books. Twenty-one-year-old midfielder David Lee did make the substitutes list, he joined from Hull in February and came up through the Tottenham youth system. Also in the squad was Daniel Webb, son of ex-Chelsea and QPR defender David. He joined on loan from Southend but found his opportunities with the Shrimpers limited after his father’s resignation from the managerial position back in October.

Stoke’s Icelandic manager Gudjon Thordarson switched to three up front for Tuesday’s four-nil win over Bury. It paid dividends and stuck with the trio of Chris Iwelumo, who scored twice in that match, Arnar Gunnlaugsson, on loan from Leicester, and Deon Burton, a Derby loanee, again tonight. The four-three-three formation would rely on full-backs Clive Clarke and Wayne Thomas bombing down the channels to support the attacking threat as the midfield three were quite narrow. That comprised ever-present Bjarni Gudjonsson, Belgian Jurgen Vandeurzen and Irishman James O’Connor. The latter came through Stoke’s youth ranks and been a part of the first team since 1998. Gudjonsson was previously on the books of Newcastle and Genk before moving to the Potteries in 2000 to link up with his dad, the current Stoke boss. More of the Icelandic contingent were on the bench, Stefan Thordarson and Brynjar Gunnarsson. Also warming up on the sidelines was former Dutch international Peter Hoekstra. Refereeing was Bill Jordan.

STO Hill STO Hendrie STO Dorigo STO Commentary Team

Presentation Team: This match was hosted by Simon Hill, more commonly found reporting on the touchline for the ITV Sport Channel. Hill moved across from BBC Radio 5 Live where he was host and reporter on their domestic and European coverage. He was no stranger in front of the camera though this season, co-hosting Division One’s Saturday evening highlights programme Football First with regular Live host Matt Smith. The format of that show allowed Smith and his pundits in the main area to dissect the key games, whilst Hill and his pundit looked at the rest of the Division over the other side of the studio. He was the leading match reporter for the regular Thursday and Sunday night Live games in a busy season for ITV. Joining him in the Britannia Stadium studio were pundits John Hendrie and Tony Dorigo. They were two of four regulars on ITV, with Russell Osman and Garry Nelson the others. Hendrie also covered our last Live match, the four-nil horror show at Brentford, and was back looking at things from an Albion perspective again tonight. The former Bradford, Middlesbrough and Barnsley striker won this Division with the Bantams back in the 1984/85 season. Tony Dorigo spent his final season playing for Stoke where he was club captain before retiring at the age of thirty-five. He moved straight into punditry with the ITV Sport Channel with his familiar Aussie accent, growing up in Adelaide before writing to more than a dozen English football clubs as a teenager asking for a trial. Aston Villa accepted and the defender went on to play more than a century of matches in claret and blue in the eighties before moving to Chelsea for four years then Leeds for a further six. At the Blues he won the second tier Championship and the Full Members Cup, whilst at Elland Road lifted the last top flight trophy before the launch of the Premiership in 1992. He earned fifteen senior England caps and Player of the Year awards at Villa, Chelsea, Leeds and in his one and only season at Italian side Torino. Before seeing out his career at the Britannia Stadium, Dorigo spent two years with Derby County.

STO Studio

In the commentary box were Guy Havord and Jim Beglin. Havord was one of Sky Sports voices of La Liga for four seasons before moving to ITV Digital. He was also used on the world feed coverage of 3pm Saturday Premiership matches, highlights of which were also used by Sky. As well as reporting on the pre-cursor to Sky Sports News, Sky Sports Centre, he was part of the team that covered the 2000 FA Cup Final when he was at the Chelsea team hotel. Prior to his television work, Havord was a commentator on BBC Radio Lancashire covering the success of the likes of Manchester City and Burnley in the North West in the early 90s. Jim Beglin’s successful playing career was devastatingly cut short in 1991 through the recurrence of a serious knee injury aged just 27. His leg was badly broken four years earlier and whilst recovering from that, Beglin picked up a knee cartilage injury too. He spent six years at Liverpool, playing over a century of matches and winning the League and Cup double in 1986 as well as the Charity Shield later that year. He played fifteen times for the Republic of Ireland and lifted the old Second Division title at Leeds in 1990. With his playing days curtailed early, Beglin moved into punditry both at home in Ireland as well as in the UK. He built up a career in the North West with ITV region Granada from the mid-90s, co-commentating on matches, punditing in the studio and even presenting sports bulletins and voicing goals round-ups for the local evening news on Granada Goals Extra and Granada Soccer Night. Beglin was utilised nationally by ITV from the 2000/01 season, working across their domestic and UEFA Champions League portfolio before becoming a prominent voice on the ITV Sport Channel this campaign. Both Beglin and Havord would be playing a part in ITV’s coverage of the 2002 World Cup. Completing tonight’s line up was touchline reporter Peter Stevenson. Like Beglin, his career had largely been based in the North West of England, spending the 1990s on regional news programme BBC North West Tonight. He started as a desk journalist writing bulletins for the programme’s hosts as well as producing studio items before moving out into the field himself. He specialised in sport and, in particular, football covering the likes of Manchester United’s European adventures and the European Championships in 2000. He joined ITV for the launch of the Sport Channel and spent much of his time still in the North West reporting on the clubs in that region for highlights shows and Live match features.

STO League Cup 1972 STO Conroy STO Thordarson STO Brighton team

The Coverage: Tonight’s build up came on-air at 7.30pm, fifteen minutes prior to kick off. This was the regular programme time for a Friday night Live match on the ITV Sport Channel. The Matchday Programme, previewing the entire Nationwide League weekend preceded the Live game from 6.30pm presented in the studio by Lisa Rogers and Albion fan Dave Beckett. This weekly show looked ahead to all the key games over the weekend, whilst an additional Sunday afternoon edition did similar for that evening’s Live match. Our Division Two clash with Stoke was one of up to fifteen matches from the third and fourth tiers of English football to be broadcast Live. The graphics were used across all of the ITV Sport Channel output, heavily relying on different shades of blue and using either a fade in or a smooth reveal across the screen. During the match, replay transitions saw the ‘ITV Sport’ part of the logo wipe from top-left to bottom-right and flipped over to reveal ‘Channel’ at the end. The most fun graphic though was when getting a yellow or red card, as an animated arm would appear and wave the card. The coverage was sponsored by Nationwide and the theme music remained a short library clip to introduce the show. Background music throughout the programme, and indeed the season, was the excellent Another Chance by Roger Sanchez. Presentation came from a studio located in the corner of the stadium. In host Simon Hill’s introduction, he outlined the potential for this Stoke City club to go places – awake “the sleeping giant” – with a stadium fit for First Division football. Meanwhile, the question was asked about how Brighton would cope without “hot-shot striker Bobby Zamora”, suspended tonight as fourth hosted second. After introducing pundits John Hendrie and Tony Dorigo, it was straight down to business. Stoke were celebrating the thirtieth anniversary of their League Cup triumph, a two-one win over Chelsea in the 1972 Final. We saw the goals from that match, complete with original Brian Moore commentary, before going down to pitchside where reporter Peter Stevenson was with the first goalscorer from that day, Terry Conroy. When it cut back to the studio, the team joked that his appearance resembled snooker great Dennis Taylor now!

STO Video Scouting STO Video Scouting analysis STO Junior Lewis STO Matches to Come

Once again, each pundit was loosely designated a team to concentrate on; John Hendrie looking at Brighton whilst, of course, Tony Dorigo focussed on his old team Stoke. Hendrie’s overall assessment of the Albion was of two sides; “Excellent at home, they’ve been absolutely magnificent at home. It’s just the past couple of months away from home, form has been a wee bit patchy.” He had watched Brighton three times in six weeks and, disappointingly, he hadn’t seen a win or even a goal from the Seagulls. Peter Stevenson spoke with the Stoke boss Gudjon Thordarson for his pre-match thoughts. He explained it was a crucial match if they were to be in the hunt for the top two; “It’s a six-pointer. We’re a bit behind and very important for us to catch up and collect the points. It [automatic promotion] will be difficult if we don’t get something out of this game.” The studio team then took a quick look at the two line-ups, singling out Stoke’s front three and Albion’s Lee Steele in “the Bobby Zamora role this evening”. Up next it was the turn of the Video Scouting reports, which you can view at the bottom of this post. Dorigo looked at the problems Stoke have had since changing their formation and style, going narrower making it easier to defend against them and lacking in width. Hendrie looked at the contrast for the Albion when playing with, and without, Bobby Zamora. With him there were chances galore, as he’s able to find space and use his creativity to conjure something up. Whereas without Zamora, the Albion lack a real target man. Clips were shown from the Oldham defeat where Danny Webb was leading the line and did not have the same positive effect. With the build-up done, time to hand over to the commentary team, at a noisy Britannia, of Guy Havord and Jim Beglin. At half time, the studio team spent around five minutes reviewing the key moments from the first half. Specifically, the opening goal from Stoke’s Chris Iwelumo and the Lee Steele chance just before half time for the Seagulls. The ‘John Hendrie jinx’ continued, having watched Brighton four times now and not yet seen them score, losing the previous three. But he was complimentary about the style of play, citing it as the best he’s seen so far from Albion. He praised the closing down and the midfield battling in particular. Just before the start of the second half, another of Stoke’s 1972 League Cup winners spoke with reporter Peter Stevenson; this time Denis Smith. Stoke wore a replica of that ’72 kit, with added modern-day sponsorship, in tribute to the thirtieth anniversary.

STO Yellow Card STO Sub STO Match Analysis STO Coming Up

At half time, the studio team spent around five minutes reviewing the key moments from the first half. Specifically, the opening goal from Stoke’s Chris Iwelumo and the Lee Steele chance just before half time for the Seagulls. The ‘John Hendrie jinx’ continued, having watched Brighton four times now and not yet seen them score, losing the previous three. But he was complimentary about the style of play, citing it as the best he’s seen so far from Albion. He praised the closing down and the midfield battling in particular. Just before the start of the second half, another of Stoke’s 1972 League Cup winners spoke with reporter Peter Stevenson; this time Denis Smith. Stoke wore a replica of that ’72 kit, with added modern-day sponsorship, in tribute to the thirtieth anniversary. Upon the full time whistle, after the commentators took a quick look at the match highlights, Stevenson caught up with Man of the Match; Stoke’s midfield engine James O’Connor. He paid tribute, half in jest, to pundit Tony Dorigo for showing Clive Clarke the ropes during their time together last season. After the break, around ten minutes of the programme remained for the studio team to wrap up and review. A look at the table showed the Albion six points off Reading with ten games left to play. Stoke in third closed the gap on Brighton to two points but having played once more. They analysed the Stoke penalty incident which restored the home side’s lead, clearly highlighting the foul from Cullip which may have been missed by viewers first time round. In his interview with Peter Stevenson, Gudjon Thordarson said it “was a tense start” but “was meant to be a very, very tight game.” He blamed a lapse in concentration for the Albion equaliser but the decision to award his side a penalty just moments later was the correct one. There wasn’t quite time to hear from Peter Taylor during the Live show, or any Brighton representative. The man usually so calm and collected on the sidelines was getting increasingly irate during the match, clearly upset with some of the officiating and furious with some costly errors. The pundits were quick to point out that, although the result was disappointing for the Seagulls, they were still second and flying, Bobby Zamora would be back available for the next match and this was the first season back at this level for six years. Things were definitely still shaping up for another terrific season and with six of the remaining ten matches at home, their destiny was in their own hands.

STO Kick Off STO Comms STO Referee STO Iwelumo goal

Story of the Match: The Seagulls got the game underway, kicking from right to left in the first half, wearing the change shorts of blue so as not to clash with Stoke’s white. The home side signalled their intentions in the third minute when a Deon Burton header went just over from close range; Kerry Mayo the defender doing just enough to put him off. That sparked the supporters into their familiar, and very loud, rendition of Tom Jones’ classic, Delilah. Albion, keen to get behind the Potters defence, were caught offside four times in the opening dozen minutes. Just that bit too eager. Stoke’s confidence grew and Michel Kuipers was called into action on a number of occasions to thwart their long range efforts. At the other end, City’s ‘keeper Neil Cutler got into a tangle with his defender Sergei Shtaniuk which almost presented Lee Steele with a tap in when the ball was dropped to the ground. Unfortunately for Steele, it didn’t come down quick enough for him to swing a leg at and the defender cleared eventually. But it was a goalkeeping error from Kuipers in the twenty-ninth minute which saw the home team break the deadlock. Clive Clarke swung a ball into the box from the left. Chris Iwelumo was the target, around twelve yards out, jumping with Simon Morgan. Kuipers thought the ball should have been his and came flying out of his goal to claim. He mistimed it, aiming a punch nowhere near and allowing Iwelumo to head into an empty net for his third goal in four days. Cue more cries of Delilah from the Staffordshire club. Kuipers had to be alert to get down low and save from Gunnlaugsson’s header just a couple of minutes later. The Dutchman’s agility keeping that effort out with Stoke firmly in the ascendancy. The rebound from Burton was fired into the side-netting. The Albion confidence dropped noticeably for the remainder of the half after the goal. However, a fantastic opportunity found its way to Lee Steele four minutes before the interval. A long ball from Richard Carpenter over the top sent Paul Brooker clear on the right wing. When the bounce settled he whipped in a fabulous first-time cross to the centre where Steele was unmarked. Six yards out, the striker stretched his leg and met it on the volley hoping to just guide it home. But Neil Cutler was alert and spread himself so it hit an outstretched arm for a vital, goal-saving block. It was by far Albion’s best opportunity. The half time whistle gave a chance to regroup with the scoreline kept to just one goal to nil. Stoke began the second half well too and could’ve doubled the advantage but for Kuipers save. Iwelumo continued to cause Albion problems, winning a header to knock it down to Gunnlaugsson. His touch took it past Junior Lewis in the box before Jurgen Vandeurzen took over to shoot. Kuipers blocked with his knees, via a little deflection on the way.

STO Penalty decision STO Missed penalty STO Equaliser STO Full Time

What followed next was a dramatic five minutes in which the game ebbed one way then the other. Lee Steele received the ball around forty yards from goal and showed real desire to take on all-comers. With four Stoke players around him he burst his way through into the penalty area before being upended by Wayne Thomas. The referee gave the penalty. It did look quite soft but the hip of Thomas just seemed to brush Steele and when running at pace it doesn’t take much to knock you off stride. After seeing a replay, cue the surprise of seeing Robbie Pethick placing the ball on the spot in front of 998 travelling Seagulls supporters. This was a man who had not scored for Brighton before and, as far as I could see, had never scored a penalty in his career. Pethick’s kick was tipped round the post by Cutler superbly. However, the drama continued from the resulting corner taken by Paul Watson. The left-footed in swinger was flicked on by Steele to Hart. His instincts stuck out a leg to prod the ball goalwards. Cutler spilled the tame effort right at the feet of Steele to nab an equaliser from just a couple of yards out. Cutler went from hero to zero in less than a minute. Immediately Stoke almost regained the lead direct from a Gunnlaugsson free kick on the edge of the box, Pethick penalised for a foul with a yellow card. To complete this bonkers few minutes, the rebound scrambled around the area before referee Bill Jordan gave Stoke a penalty. The Brighton players were infuriated. The replay showed Danny Cullip’s attempt at blocking off Gudjonsson to be illegal, using the length of his forearm to chop at the neck and correctly a penalty was awarded, with a yellow card to boot. Up stepped Arnar Gunnlaugsson to tuck the dead ball away, low in the corner to his right for his first City goal. Brighton were level for all of three minutes. The hour mark signalled a change for Peter Taylor, in both personnel and formation, bringing Pethick off for Daniel Webb. Lee Steele’s frustrating night was summed up when he was booked for diving when actually there was clear contact. And followed up a minute later when a great pass from Watson sent him through on goal. His touch took it away from firstly Thomas, then the goalkeeper but, off balance, his shot was sliced horribly wide when there were better placed options available. With a quarter of an hour to go, the frustration of Webb got the better of him when he was the next name to go in the book for a wild barge into Cutler. The absence of Zamora loomed large over Brighton. The final roll of the dice saw Steve Melton replace Gary Hart in the middle. Brighton piled on the pressure but Stoke dug deep and restricted them to no serious chances in the closing stages. But it was the red and white stripes who had the final say, clinching victory with another goal four minutes from time. Full back Clive Clarke was the unlikely scorer, his second ever League goal, running in from the left and playing a great one-two with substitute Peter Hoekstra. Clarke continued his run and hit a delightful left-footed strike to almost loop over the defenders and out of Kuipers reach to fly into the far side of the net. A sublime way to round off a vital win for Stoke. Full time under the lights with a fantastic atmosphere, Stoke City three, Brighton and Hove Albion one. The small matter of the leaders Reading was to come for the Albion in eight days’ time; get a result there and not only automatic promotion was very much on, but also the title. The final home match of the campaign against Swindon would turn out to be a celebratory one to cap off a magnificent season for the Seagulls.

STO Table

STOKE 3 BRIGHTON 1
Iwelumo, Gunnlaugsson, Clarke Steele

STO Replay

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Small Screen Seagulls; FA Cup Away at the Big Boys

Small Screen Seagulls 2000sWith the move to the Withdean Stadium in 1999, Brighton’s fortunes on the field began improving markedly. Whilst the 1990s was a decade of decline, slipping down the Leagues and almost into oblivion, the early part of the 21st Century was a complete reversal of this. The biggest of the FA Cup ties whilst at Withdean were actually played on the road, with four trips to Premier League sides during that period. As the Albion climbed up the Football League, the ultimate aim was to join these Big Boys in the top flight for the first time since 1983. That season, the one and only time Brighton had reached the FA Cup Final (well, technically two including the Replay) was combined with relegation from the elite League. With financial troubles and homelessness, we seemed a world away from the huge riches of the Premier League but the ambitions of the club laid there. Here, take a look at the four occasions where Brighton got that little taste of the top table as we travelled in the FA Cup away at the Big Boys. Relive the games through clips of extended highlights and round up from BBC and ITV.


 

2004/05 Round Three goals

Match of the Day, BBC One (8th January 2005); Tottenham 2-1 Brighton 

2005 R3Tot Titles MOTD Studio 2005 2005 R3Tot Intro

The 2004/05 season was Brighton’s first back in the second tier after a year away. Having won the Division Two Play Off Final in May 2004, the Seagulls were plying their trade in the newly named Championship and things had begun a lot better than the last time at this level. At the mid-way point of the season, an FA Cup trip to White Hart Lane presented Mark McGhee’s men with a chance to face Premiership opposition in the form of Tottenham Hotspur. BBC held terrestrial FA Cup rights and a report was shown on Match of the Day on Third Round Saturday, the first time teams from the top two tiers entered the fray. The show was presented by Mark Pougatch, normally a leading voice on Radio Five Live, in a busy day for him having presented the lunchtime Live match that day. He was joined in the studio in London for the highlights by Lee Dixon and Gavin Peacock, two fringe BBC pundits. Reporter Rebecca Lowe voiced the goals round up.

2005 R3Tot Carpenter crossbar          2005 R3Tot King goal 2005 R3Tot Equaliser          2005 R3Tot Celebrations

Brighton, wearing the change kit of yellow, began well and hit the crossbar after a quarter of an hour when Richard Carpenter struck one from twenty-five yards out on the half-volley (above, top left). But it was the higher Division side who took the lead just before the break. A short corner on the far side was crossed into the box. England defender Ledley King met with a header on the edge of the six yard line which looped up and over goalkeeper Michel Kuipers to bounce in (above, top right). A couple of minutes after half time, Albion found the perfect response when Carpenter did get his goal this time. It came directly from a free kick from twenty-two yards which curled round the wall and beat Paul Robinson in goal to equalise brilliantly (above, bottom left). As the game was heading for a replay, Robbie Keane won it with an extraordinary goal from the edge of the area (below, top left). Seven minutes remained when the ball was chipped in to him from the left. With his back to goal and Guy Butters pressing high, he took one touch to control with his chest before swivelling and shooting on the volley. It flew into the top corner for one of the goals of the season. Afterwards, the Irishman presented his old Wolves manager McGhee with a signed shirt and had praise for the Albion in his interview; “They didn’t give us many chances, Brighton. They were so tight and congested in the midfield.” Spurs progressed to the Sixth Round where Newcastle eventually knocked them out, whilst Brighton survived relegation from the Championship thanks to a final day draw with Ipswich Live on Sky.

2005 R3Tot Keane winner 2005 R3Tot Keane 2005 R3Tot Final score


2006/07 Round Three highlights

Match of the Day, BBC One (6th January 2007); West Ham 3-0 Brighton 

2007 R3WHam Titles 2007 R3WHam Studio 2007 R3WHam Comm 2007 R3WHam Team News

Following relegation from the Championship in 2006 and a poor start to the League One campaign, Mark McGhee was sacked in September and replaced by youth team coach and former Albion midfielder Dean Wilkins. Brighton’s FA Cup matches couldn’t have gone better this season, back having to begin at Round One again after a couple of years in at the Third. The first game saw a Withdean record; an eight-nil victory over non-League Northwich Victoria. This was followed up by a three-nil scoreline against another non-League outfit, Stafford Rangers. With the top teams entering at Round Three, last season’s losing finalists West Ham were drawn to play the Seagulls at their famous Upton Park stadium. Terrestrial Cup broadcaster BBC showed brief highlights of the clash with commentary during their Saturday night Match of the Day broadcast. This was hosted from Television Centre by Ray Stubbs alongside pundits Lee Dixon and Gavin Peacock. When the Premiership highlights returned to the BBC after three years away in 2004, every match was covered with a commentary and these extra voices were utilised during the Cup shows. Commentating on our tie was MotD regular Alistair Mann. The edit was only short so the teams were not displayed in full, instead opting to use the scrolling info bar at the bottom of the screen, where Arsenal defender Joe O’Cearull made his Albion debut.

2007 R3WHam Opener 2007 R3WHam Cole goal 2007 R3WHam Zamora chance 2007 R3WHam Third goal

The Seagulls wore their change kit of white shirts with blue shorts and socks. The two debutants, O’Cearull for us and Luis Boa Morte for the home side, tangled legs in the first half and risked giving West Ham a penalty. Referee Mark Halsey deemed it accidental. Tommy Fraser had a good chance for Brighton when presented with a heading chance unmarked in the centre, the connection though lacked any pace and was easy for Roy Carroll in the sticks. Right at the start of the second half, the deadlock was broken by youth graduate Mark Noble – his first goal for the club. Boa Morte’s cross on the left was flicked over by Guy Butters, then headed down by Carlos Tevez into Noble’s path to run on to. As the defender rushed to block, Noble got his shot away (above, top left) on the half-volley which Wayne Henderson in goal wasn’t quite able to keep out. Alex Revell came close to an equaliser but couldn’t quite reach to nod home from Hart’s cross as the opportunity flashed across goal. Punishment came just before the hour mark when Carlton Cole made it two (above, top right), despite Albion protesting offside. Boa Morte’s cross found Cole unmarked to sidefoot volley into the top corner. Former Seagull Bobby Zamora, on the books of West Ham having moved from Spurs, came on and was inches from netting. Yossi Benayoun made contact with the ball to send it skidding to the back post where Zamora was. Zamora tried to get the definitive touch just as it was about to touch the post and it just ended up flying back off the woodwork (above, bottom left), the offside flag would have prevented him had he scored anyway. With virtually the final kick of the match, West Ham got their third through Hayden Mullins heading home Shaun Newton’s cross (above, bottom right). Three-nil the final scoreline.

2007 R3WHam Final Score 2007 R3WHam Wilkins 2007 R3WHam Analysis

In his post match interview, manager Dean Wilkins thought his young side showed their inexperience in attack; “I think if we’d have shown a bit more calmness, a bit more awareness, within the final third once we did break I think we could have scored the first goal.” Former Albion player Alan Curbishley had newly been appointed West Ham boss and called for his fans to get behind their midfielder Nigel Reo-Coker after being on the end of plenty of abuse all season. The stats showed equal possession but West Ham dominating the shots and corners. In the studio, Gavin Peacock analysed the Clarets new look, with particular focus on how well Carlos Tevez played; “He was bright and he was lively and aggressive in his running.” The Hammers exited at the hands of Watford in the next round. Brighton’s season saw them continue to struggle as costs were tightened and the playing squad increasingly dominated by unknown youngsters. The Albion finished in eighteenth in the League One table.


2009/10 Round Four highlights

FA Cup Highlights, ITV1 (23rd January 2010); Aston Villa 3-2 Brighton

2010 R4Vil Titles 2010 R4Vil Studio 2010 R4Vil Intro

Much had changed at Brighton since the FA Cup trip to West Ham in 2007. The biggest news was the stadium, as Falmer had finally been given the go-ahead and work had begun at the site with completion due for summer 2011. The man in the dugout at Withdean had changed twice since then too. After a makeshift first season, Dean Wilkins guided the Seagulls to an impressive seventh place in the 2007/08 campaign, narrowly missing out on the League One Play Offs. Yet that wasn’t enough to keep his job and former boss Micky Adams returned to the hot seat in May 2008. Having guided us to the, then, Division Three title in 2001 before the Premiership came calling, optimism was high upon his return. However that did not work out at all, with League form slipping finishing sixteenth in 2008/09 and not improving much in the opening months of the 2009/10 campaign. Chairman Dick Knight wielded the axe in November and brought in former Chelsea and Tottenham midfielder Gus Poyet for his first managerial role. With the club in the bottom six upon his arrival, he changed the philosophy of the team from long-ball to a skilful passing side. Some took to it better than others, whilst others such as Adam El-Abd were transformed under Poyet. He got off to a perfect start with a three-one away win at Southampton Live on Sky in his first match, and steadily lifted the club up the table. The FA Cup campaign began with a caretaker manager, Martin Hinshelwood took charge of the incredible four-four draw at Wycombe, before the two-nil victory at Withdean saw Poyet make it two wins out of two. In Round Two there was a closer-fought three-two win to knock Rushden and Diamonds out, whilst Torquay were dispatched in Round Three by a goal to nil at Plainmoor. The Fourth Round draw saw a trip to the Midlands to face Premier League Aston Villa, managed by Martin O’Neill. FA Cup rights had transferred from the BBC to ITV in 2008, and the commercial network broadcast their Fourth Round highlights show on the Saturday night which included a short commentary edit on our clash. Their theme tune brought in this season was by The Enemy, titled Be Somebody; rather apt for a competition known for smaller clubs making their name.

2010 R4Vil Comm 2010 R4Vil 1st goal 2010 R4Vil Elphick goal 2010 R4Vil Young goal 

Ned Boulting was in the presenter’s chair in the London Studio for this edition, joined by ITV pundit Robbie Earle and former Brighton manager, amongst many other clubs, Steve Coppell. In the commentary box was John Rawling. He was more familiar as their voice of boxing, having covered the sport previously for Radio Five Live and Setanta, but was used over the past couple of seasons infrequently on Football League and Champions League highlights shows. Gus Poyet was relying on his prolific strike force of Glenn Murray and Nicky Forster to continue to fire together, with support from the likes of Andrew Crofts and Elliott Bennett behind them. Adam Virgo had returned to the club after a couple of seasons away and joined a defence which included academy graduate Tommy Elphick. Villa’s side included former Albion loanee Steve Sidwell in midfield and had hit scored six past Blackburn whilst conceding four in the League Cup the previous midweek. Fifty-six League places separated the sides at the start of play, and it was Villa who got off to the better start with a goal after just five minutes. Captain Ashley Young sent Marc Albrighton running down the wing. He skipped past the lunge of Elphick before crossing low for Nathan Delfouneso to steer home from close range (above, top right). Brighton responded four minutes before the break through Elliott Bennett’s corner on the far side. A number of Albion players were waiting in space in the middle. It came off Adam El Abd and landed on the six yard line for fellow defender Tommy Elphick to swivel and finish expertly (above, bottom left) for the equaliser past several claret and blue bodies in the way. Rawling rightly described them as “the Villa defence all over the place!” It took just three second-half minutes for the home side to regain the lead thanks to Young’s header. Stewart Downing stood the ball up to the back post where Young jumped highest and saw his header fly past Kuipers and in off the post (above, bottom right).

2010 R4Vil Delph goal 2010 R4Vil Forster goal 2010 R4Vil Final Score 2010 R4Vil Poyet

James Milner provided Fabian Delph with an excellent chance to score a third but Kuipers was equal to it, using his body to block effectively before the defence helped him out. The two Villans combined with less than half an hour to play and this time they did make it three-one. Milner sent Delph clear, covering defender Inigo Calderon got back to force him to check his run. However, the opportunity still presented itself and his strike on the edge of the box went through Calderon’s legs and under the diving hand of Kuipers to score and put the game to bed (above, top left). Brighton did get a consolation in stoppage time thanks to Nicky Forster to make the scoreline more respectable. The ball across was dummied and found Forster in the centre with his back to goal. He held off the defender before arching his body to swivel and shoot, much like Elphick in the first half. The finish was clinical, as you’d expect from a man who scored goals wherever he went in his career, low and hard into the back of the net past Brad Guzan (above, top right). This was the striker’s fiftieth for Brighton. It was too little too late for the Seagulls, whose FA Cup adventure came to an end at the Fourth Round stage for the first time since a trip to Manchester United in 1993. Gus Poyet afterwards admitted he was aware of the size of the task against a Premier League club; “I knew it was difficult to cope for more than an hour with the same pace, the strength of the opposition… They are not only better technically, they are better physically.” Villa progressed all the way to Wembley and the Semi Finals. After seeing off Crystal Palace and Reading, it was eventual winners Chelsea who knocked them out. Brighton continued to flourish under Poyet, who steered them to a thirteenth placed finish in League One with the foundations laid for a good season to come.


2010/11 Round Five highlights

FA Cup Highlights, ITV1 (19th February 2011); Stoke City 3-0 Brighton 

2011 R5Sto Titles 2011 R5Sto Smith 2011 R5Sto Teams

The 2010/2011 campaign was Brighton’s final one at the eleven-year temporary home of Withdean Stadium. Gus Poyet and his entertaining football side were tearing League One apart, climbing to the summit early on and never looking back. They were on course to open the new home in Falmer with Championship football and a title to boot. The good form also transferred to the FA Cup, where Brighton reached the Fifth Round – the last sixteen of the competition – for the first time in twenty-five years. After a shaky start, drawing nil-nil at home to Woking and needing a penalty shoot-out in the replay to progress, round two saw a shock draw with non-League FC United of Manchester. A four-nil win in the replay was more like it. The third round saw an impressive three-one victory over Portsmouth, Cup finalists the year before and a Division above in the Championship before a further second tier side was sent packing in round four as Watford were beaten on their own patch. This set up a meeting with Tony Pulis’s Premier League Stoke City at the Britannia. It would be a clash of styles, with Pulis known for the long ball game and utilising throw-ins, up against Poyet’s more modern, passing game. The Cup schedule was a little all over the place, with Fourth Round matches taking place at the same time owing to postponements and replays congesting matters. So ITV’s Saturday night highlights show featured action from both stages, presented by Matt Smith. The theme tune was the same as the previous year; The Enemy with Be Somebody, but the graphics went through a transformation. Commentating on the action was freelancer Jim Proudfoot, formerly of Sky Sports and Setanta but here more frequently heard on ESPN’s European Leagues and talkSPORT radio. He is also remembered fondly by Albion fans for his excited scream of “STORERRRRR!” during his South Coast Radio days, commentating on Brighton’s final game at the Goldstone against Doncaster in 1997 alongside Tony Millard.

2011 R5Sto Comm 2011 R5Sto Carew goal 2011 R5Sto 2nd goal 2011 R5Sto Shawcross goal

Elite level referee Howard Webb was the man in charge of this tie. The team line ups saw almost a full strength Stoke, with last year’s top scorer in the Cup John Carew up front. Kenwynne Jones was missing but had regulars Jon Walters, Jermaine Pennant, Rory Delap and Matthew Etherington all ready to create the danger. The back line of Shawcross and Huth took no prisoners in a physical set up. The Albion had Cup ‘keeper Peter Brezovan in goal, supported in front by Tommy Elphick, captain Gordon Greer and Marcos Painter. Elliott Bennett and Gary Dicker would look to provide Barnes and Murray with the opportunities, whilst Liam Bridcutt was the rock protecting the defence. Set pieces were Stoke’s main goal threat, be it free kicks, corners or the throw in. Rory Delap was renowned for the latter and it was exactly that which created the opening goal. Delap chucked it in to the mixer where Brezovan came to collect. He didn’t get there ahead of big John Carew who just flicked it on with the top of his head and into the net before the quarter of an hour mark. It soon became two-nil eight minutes later after Jermaine Pennant teed up Marc Wilson to cross on the overlap. His ball in was met by the head of Walters at the near post through the arms of Brezovan and gave the Albion a mountain to climb so early on. Brezovan wasn’t covering himself in glory and flapped at another punch later on, giving Walters another chance which had to be headed off the line by Greer. Barnes and Murray combined with an interchange to give Barnes a rare sight of goal but his effort was lifted high and over. The third Stoke goal came two minutes before the break and began, you guessed it, from another dangerous corner. Pennant’s ball in was flicked on at the near post to the far one where Ryan Shawcross was arriving. He lost his marker and bulleted the ball in with his head, nobody on the line and too much power for Brezovan to react in time. The Potters captain had sealed the result before we’d even reached half time, Brighton had no answer to the brute force of the red and white stripes. Substitute Cristian Baz went closest for the Seagulls in the second half but in truth it wasn’t troubling Sorensen whilst another sub – Jake Forster-Caskey – also tried his luck but it wasn’t to be and Brighton lost by three goals to nil.

2011 R5Sto Final score 2011 R5Sto Poyet 2011 R5Sto Studio 2011 R5Sto Allardyce

Gus Poyet said in his post match chat “We tried. I think the best part is we didn’t change our game.” This point was picked up on by the former Bolton and Blackburn boss Sam Allardyce in the London Studio for ITV; “If you go and watch Stoke City and do your scouting, your normal game you cannot play if it’s a passing game because Stoke don’t let you.” He said the application of constant pressure, corner after corner, broke down Brighton and the physical edge paid dividends once more for them at the Brit. It was a tactic that took Stoke City all the way to the FA Cup Final where they lost to a solitary Manchester City goal at Wembley in the process securing them a thirteenth place Premier League finish and a spot in the UEFA Europa League qualifying. The Seagulls soared to the League One title, beating Southampton by three points, to secure a dream start to life at Falmer with a promotion party. In doing so they were one step closer to that top flight dream. With the foundations in place for something special, the early years at the new ground would be about building on all these experiences gained during the Withdean years and push for that final hurdle up to the top. It was beginning to look very exciting again for Brighton and Hove Albion.


Although the Albion lost on all four of these occasions, they were reaching the stages of the FA Cup where they hadn’t been for a long time. Therefore the opposition were of increased quality. The trips to these fantastic Premier League stadiums were in stark contrast to the home ground where Brighton had played since 1999; Withdean. This spurred the players on to perform better, to show they are worthy of these fine venues and, most importantly, highlighted how much of a necessity it was that the Seagulls had one of these to call their own. The Amex opened its doors in the summer of 2011 with Brighton League One Champions and about to compete in the second tier again. Within weeks of the new campaign at the new home, Premier League teams were coming to our place and being impressed with the facilities. The next aim? To become one of those elite clubs ourselves. Withdean served us well but Falmer would catapult the club to new heights with the big boys, and the Cup would provide some great days.